camel


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cam·el

 (kăm′əl)
n.
1. Either of two chiefly domesticated ruminant mammals of the genus Camelus, the Bactrian camel or the dromedary, having a humped back and long neck, and used in northern Africa, the Middle East, and Asia as a beast of burden and a source of wool, milk, and meat.
2. A device used to raise sunken objects, consisting of a hollow structure that is submerged, attached tightly to the object, and pumped free of water. Also called caisson.
3. Sports A spin in figure skating that is performed in an arabesque or modified arabesque position.
4. A tan or yellowish brown.

[Middle English, from Old English and from Anglo-Norman cameil, both from Latin camēlus, from Greek kamēlos, of Semitic origin; see gml in Semitic roots.]

camel

(ˈkæməl)
n
1. (Animals) either of two cud-chewing artiodactyl mammals of the genus Camelus: family Camelidae. They are adapted for surviving long periods without food or water in desert regions, esp by using humps on the back for storing fat. See Arabian camel, Bactrian camel
2. (General Engineering) a float attached to a vessel to increase its buoyancy. See also caisson3
3. (Nautical Terms) a raft or float used as a fender between a vessel and a wharf
4. (Colours)
a. a fawn colour
b. (as adjective): a camel dress.
[Old English, from Latin camēlus, from Greek kamēlos, of Semitic origin; related to Arabic jamal]

cam•el

(ˈkæm əl)

n.
1. either of two large, humped ruminants of the genus Camelus, of the Old World. Compare Bactrian camel, dromedary.
2. a color ranging from yellowish tan to yellowish brown.
3. a spin in skating done in an arabesque position.
4. a float for increasing the buoyancy of a laden vessel.
[before 950; Middle English, Old English < Latin camēlus < Greek kámēlos < Semitic; compare Hebrew gāmāl]
cam′el•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.camel - cud-chewing mammal used as a draft or saddle animal in desert regionscamel - cud-chewing mammal used as a draft or saddle animal in desert regions
artiodactyl, artiodactyl mammal, even-toed ungulate - placental mammal having hooves with an even number of functional toes on each foot
Camelus, genus Camelus - type genus of the Camelidae: camels
Arabian camel, Camelus dromedarius, dromedary - one-humped camel of the hot deserts of northern Africa and southwestern Asia
Bactrian camel, Camelus bactrianus - two-humped camel of the cold deserts of central Asia
Translations
камила
velbloud
kamel
kamelo
kaamel
شتر
kameli
devakamila
teve
unta
úlfaldiúlfaldi: drómedari ; kameldÿr
ラクダ駱駝
낙타
camelacamelus
kupranugaris
kamielis
cămilă
ťavadromedár
kamelavelblod
kameldromedar
ngamia
อูฐ
devehecin
верблюд
con lạc đàlạc đà

camel

[ˈkæməl]
A. N
1. (= animal) → camello m
2. (= colour) → color m camello
B. CPD camel coat N (also camelhair coat) → abrigo m de pelo de camello
camel hair Npelo m de camello

camel

[ˈkæməl] nchameau mcamel hair camel's hair [ˈkæməlz] modif [brush, coat] → en poil de chameau

camel

nKamel nt
attr (= colour) coatkamelhaarfarben

camel

[ˈkæml]
1. ncammello
2. adj (colour) → color cammello inv

camel

(ˈkӕməl) noun
a desert animal with one (dromedary (ˈdromədəri) ) or two (bactrian (camel) (ˈbӕktriən) ) humps on its back, used for carrying goods and/or people.

camel

جَمَل velbloud kamel Kamel καμήλα camello kameli chameau deva cammello ラクダ 낙타 kameel kamel wielbłąd camelo верблюд kamel อูฐ deve con lạc đà 骆驼
References in classic literature ?
Hepzibah's final operation was with the little devourer of Jim Crow and the elephant, who now proposed to eat a camel.
So that for an hour or more, a thousand fathoms in the sea, he carries a surplus stock of vitality in him, just as the camel crossing the waterless desert carries a surplus supply of drink for future use in its four supplementary stomachs.
Moreover, you must walk like a camel, which is said to be the only beast which ruminates when walking.
Creakle's part of the house was a good deal more comfortable than ours, and he had a snug bit of garden that looked pleasant after the dusty playground, which was such a desert in miniature, that I thought no one but a camel, or a dromedary, could have felt at home in it.
He made all-- Thorn for the camel, fodder for the kine, And mother's heart for sleepy head, O little son of mine!
From this shop she went to a butcher's, a grocer's, and a poulterer's, till at last the porter exclaimed in despair, "My good lady, if you had only told me you were going to buy enough provisions to stock a town, I would have brought a horse, or rather a camel.
There is a mythical story of a wonderful speaking-trumpet possessed by Alexander the Great, by which he could call a soldier who was ten miles distant; but there was probably no substitute for the human voice except flags and beacon-fires, or any faster method of travel than the gait of a horse or a camel across ungraded plains.
All that you have seen to-night has been make-believe; I'm not the woman to let the black of my nail suffer for such a camel, much less die
In trooped the motley organization-- black slaves and dark hued Arabs of the northern deserts; cursing camel drivers urging on their vicious charges; overburdened donkeys, waving sadly pendulous ears while they endured with stoic patience the brutalities of their masters; goats, sheep and horses.
Adam was not a man to be gratuitously superstitious, but he had the blood of the peasant in him as well as of the artisan, and a peasant can no more help believing in a traditional superstition than a horse can help trembling when he sees a camel.
THE plains over which the travellers were journeying continued to be destitute of trees or even shrubs; insomuch that they had to use the dung of the buffalo for fuel, as the Arabs of the desert use that of the camel.
Half pushed, half towed, he arrived at the high gate of the Kashmir Serai: that huge open square over against the railway station, surrounded with arched cloisters, where the camel and horse caravans put up on their return from Central Asia.