camellia


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ca·mel·lia

 (kə-mēl′yə)
n.
Any of several evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Camellia native to eastern Asia, especially C. japonica, having shiny leaves and showy roselike flowers that are usually red, white, or pink.

[New Latin Camellia, genus name, after Georg Josef Kamel (1661-1706), Moravian Jesuit missionary.]

camellia

(kəˈmiːlɪə)
n
(Plants) any ornamental shrub of the Asian genus Camellia, esp C. japonica, having glossy evergreen leaves and showy roselike flowers, usually white, pink, or red in colour: family Theaceae. Also called: japonica
[C18: New Latin, named after Georg Josef Kamel (1661–1706), Moravian Jesuit missionary, who introduced it to Europe]

ca•mel•lia

(kəˈmil yə, -ˈmi li ə)

n., pl. -lias.
any of several shrubs of the genus Camellia, of the tea family, having glossy evergreen leaves and roselike flowers of white, pink, or red.
[1745–55; after German. J. Camellus (1661–1706), Jesuit missionary]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.camellia - any of several shrubs or small evergreen trees having solitary white or pink or reddish flowerscamellia - any of several shrubs or small evergreen trees having solitary white or pink or reddish flowers
genus Camellia - tropical Asiatic evergreen shrubs or small trees
Camellia japonica, japonica - greenhouse shrub with glossy green leaves and showy fragrant rose-like flowers; cultivated in many varieties
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Translations
شَجَرَةُ الكاميليا
kamélie
kamelia
kamélia
kamelía, kamelíufrú
kamelija
kamēlija
kamélia

camellia

[kəˈmiːlɪə] Ncamelia f

camellia

[kəˈmiːlɪə] ncamélia m

camellia

nKamelie f

camellia

[kəˈmiːlɪə] ncamelia

camellia

(kəˈmiːliə) noun
(the red or white flower of) an evergreen shrub from eastern Asia.
References in classic literature ?
Countess Sotski and Sophia Bespalova, as everyone knew, were coming with white camellia bouquets.
Now put the flowers just here," and Fanny laid a pink camellia in a nest of fuzz, and stuck a spray of daphne straight up at the back of her head.
These lovely daphnes will give odor to my camellias, and you were a dear to bring them.
After this feature, I noticed next his beautiful brown wig; his sparkling little gray eyes; his rosy complexion; his short military whisker, dyed to match his wig; his white teeth and his winning smile; his smart blue frock-coat, with a camellia in the button-hole; and his splendid ring, a ruby, flashing on his little finger as he courteously signed to me to take a chair.
She admires a flower (pink camellia japonica, price half-a-crown), in my button-hole.
Then the house had been boldly planned with a ball-room, so that, instead of squeezing through a narrow passage to get to it (as at the Chiverses') one marched solemnly down a vista of enfiladed drawing- rooms (the sea-green, the crimson and the bouton d'or), seeing from afar the many-candled lustres reflected in the polished parquetry, and beyond that the depths of a conservatory where camellias and tree-ferns arched their costly foliage over seats of black and gold bamboo.
The dance over, the two, as became an affianced couple, wandered into the conservatory; and sitting behind a tall screen of tree-ferns and camellias Newland pressed her gloved hand to his lips.
There he saw dazzling camellias expanding themselves, with flowers which were giving forth their last colours and perfumes, not on bushes, but on trees, and within bamboo enclosures, cherry, plum, and apple trees, which the Japanese cultivate rather for their blossoms than their fruit, and which queerly-fashioned, grinning scarecrows protected from the sparrows, pigeons, ravens, and other voracious birds.
A new bridle of shining leather with buckles of polished brass was on his back; two white camellias were tied to his ears; ribbons and tassels of red silk adorned his mane, which was divided into many curls.
She had always a new bonnet on, and flowers bloomed perpetually in it, or else magnificent curling ostrich feathers, soft and snowy as camellias.
Currently, more than 60% of the WWW servers worldwide have the OpenSSL toolkit installed, and in the future Camellia will be sequentially installed into these servers.
The extension of Camellia cipher support of Spitfire benefits our customers in Japan, Korea and European Union (EU) who are expected to be early adoptors of Camellia.