cameralist


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cameralist

a mercantilist economist of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who believed in the doctrine that a nation’s wealth could be made greater by increasing its supply of money. — cameralistic, adj.
See also: Economics
References in periodicals archive ?
130) Raeff developed this idea further in his 1983 study of cameralist methods of governance in the German lands and Russia, which emphasized the difficulty of their transplantation in the East, because of inadequate social institutions and "intermediary bodies.
While the origins of public finance as a systematic field of study can be dated to the cameralist writers who appeared in the Germanic lands in the 16th century (Backhaus and Wagner 1987), probably the best known early and systematic statement of public finance occurs in Book V of Adam Smith's (1776) Wealth of Nations.
This conjunction can be found, arguably, in Humboldt's critique of the cameralist politics of state welfare and his vision of a night watchman state unshackling the self-activity of individuals; in Constant's critique of the excessively moralistic conception of ancient liberty; and, of course, in Mill's articulation of his "one simple principle" in On Liberty (it is also clearly prefigured in Adam Smith's analysis of the "natural system of liberty").
The lack of a clearly delineated private-public divide in Russia distinguished it from the eighteenth-century German lands, where cameralist reformists gradually delineated the private sphere, as Isabel Hull has shown.
In one of the most intriguing sections of Inventing the Indigenous, Cooper explores the connections between cameralist economic philosophy, natural history texts, and nascent patriotism, and explains that during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, interest in previously overlooked natural objects grew to such an extent in German territories that it resulted in a form of budding tourism, as authors of regional mineralogies sought to retrieve and publicize the locations of potentially useful geological resources.
Police (polizei in German) was at its essence a continental concept connoting family of regulatory institutions in the German cameralist vein.
For instance, the cameralist regimes that emerged in the 16th century were operated quite differently from the various mercantilist empires to their west.
Furthermore, cameralist plans hatched during the Enlightenment to create a network of priest-doctors came to nothing in Germany and Sweden.
The daughter of Heinrich von Justi, a controversial and prolific cameralist, she was reputedly one of a handful of eighteenth-century German women to be awarded a university degree.
Employing evidence from cameralist literature, Wellenreuther makes a convincing argument for a "culture of migrating" shaping daily experience in eighteenth-century Europe and America, which did not encompass separate processes for those crossing the Atlantic (p.
Further, Kaufman argues that Kant's critique of state paternalism needs to be situated in its historical context as a polemic against the Cameralist tradition of German political economy.
These shifts reflect the influence of mercantilist and cameralist thinking which argued that the health of populations was a key aspect to the health of the state.