cameralist


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cameralist

a mercantilist economist of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who believed in the doctrine that a nation’s wealth could be made greater by increasing its supply of money. — cameralistic, adj.
See also: Economics
References in periodicals archive ?
Police (polizei in German) was at its essence a continental concept connoting family of regulatory institutions in the German cameralist vein.
For instance, the cameralist regimes that emerged in the 16th century were operated quite differently from the various mercantilist empires to their west.
Furthermore, cameralist plans hatched during the Enlightenment to create a network of priest-doctors came to nothing in Germany and Sweden.
Employing evidence from cameralist literature, Wellenreuther makes a convincing argument for a "culture of migrating" shaping daily experience in eighteenth-century Europe and America, which did not encompass separate processes for those crossing the Atlantic (p.
These shifts reflect the influence of mercantilist and cameralist thinking which argued that the health of populations was a key aspect to the health of the state.
The cameralist roots of Menger are discussed by Paul Silverman.
Even seventeenth-century cameralist thinkers who viewed a large population as a source of cheap labor and national wealth had no ambition or even conception of managing reproduction to control the quantity and quality of children born.
But their goals were less narrowly fiscal, and they lacked the cameralist faith in the ability of the state to achieve its goals through coercive means.
Thus the volume includes sections that amount to detailed historiographical essays on, for example, cameralist policy in the German states of the Old Regime, the peculiar political-social structure of ducal government in Wurttemberg, the particular character of industrial development in Wurttemberg, and Lutheran pietism in the German Southwest.
In this case Frederick William followed in the footsteps of his grandfather, the "great Elector," who is generally credited with beginning the momentum that was to lead to the rise of Brandenburg-Prussia, and who established both his Protestant and cameralist boiza fides by his absorption of the French Huguenots exiled by Louis XIV after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685.
Taylor concentrates on the period after 1762, when a largely conscripted army replaced a technically voluntary one, creating what he characterizes as a putting-out system based on indentured labor run for the benefit of English capitalism by a German princely entrepreneur The Cameralist state was supposed to harmonize the different functions of the productive households composing it while each Hausvater harmonized the interests of the individuals within his household, thus generating household and State income without disturbing the pre-established Leibnizian social harmony.
lt;pre> SYNONYMIC OFFSPRING loveage (lovage) GO - LEAVE capture CUT - PARE chainless SHIN - SCALE superates REST - PAUSE delimitate ITEM - DETAIL paltriest SPLIT - TEAR literal AIR - TELL parents NAP - REST cameralists CLAIM - ASSERT readvise AID - SERVE charades RACE - DASH spikenel (spignel, a plant) PEEL - SKIN batterings START - BEGIN threnodial RETAIN - HOLD treescape PEACE - REST wycari (vicary n.