canaller

canaller

(kəˈnælə)
n
a person who works on a canal boat
References in classic literature ?
Freely depicted in his own vocation, gentlemen, the Canaller would make a fine dramatic hero, so abundantly and picturesquely wicked is he.
Your chicha's very fine; and ere proceeding further I will tell ye what our Canallers are; for such information may throw side-light upon my story.
But sliding down the ropes like baleful comets, the two Canallers rushed into the uproar, and sought to drag their man out of it towards the forecastle.
It was at this point, gentlemen, that enraged by the defection of seven of his former associates, and stung by the mocking voice that had last hailed him, and maddened by his long entombment in a place as black as the bowels of despair; it was then that Steelkilt proposed to the two Canallers, thus far apparently of one mind with him, to burst out of their hole at the next summoning of the garrison; and armed with their keen mincing knives (long, crescentic, heavy implements with a handle at each end) run a muck from the bowsprit to the taffrail; and if by any devilishness of desperation possible, seize the ship.
Freely depicted in his own vocation, gentlemen, the Canaller would make a fine dramatic hero, so abundantly and picturesquely wicked is he.
We have seen many whale-ships in our harbors, but never heard of your Canallers.
Similar reciprocities characterized the lives of North American canallers studied by Peter Way in the period 1780-1860, and these also frame Andrea Graziosi's discussion of unskilled labour in the United States of 1880-1915.
Democratic occupations, by contrast, included nonprofessional service (largely clerks and schoolteachers and therefore young men), the building trades, transportation ("the canallers and rail road workmen," according to one Whig), and especially unskilled laborers.
Accidents occurred with great frequency, but more significantly, canallers were prey to infectious diseases, typhoid, cholera and smallpox.
In areas where labor was in demand, canallers could exact relatively high wages; elsewhere, they were paid at basic common day labor wage rates.
28) Palmer does not restrict his consideration to strikes, and identifies over 400 riots predominantly involving canallers, railway, ship, and other labourers, seamen, soldiers, and raftsmen.
In forceful and often poetic prose, Peter Way seeks to understand the lives of ordinary canallers in the relatively brief but energetic wave of canal construction from the late 18th to mid-19th century.