canary


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Related to canary: Domestic Canary

ca·nar·y

 (kə-nâr′ē)
n. pl. ca·nar·ies
1. A small finch (Serinus canaria) native to the Canary Islands that is greenish to yellow and has long been bred as a cage bird.
2. Slang
a. A woman singer.
b. An informer; a stool pigeon.
3. A sweet white wine from the Canary Islands, similar to Madeira.
4. A light to moderate or vivid yellow.

[French canari, from Spanish canario, of the Canary Islands, from (Islas) Canarias, Canary (Islands), from Late Latin Canāriae (Īnsulae), (islands) of dogs, from Latin canārius, pertaining to dogs, canine, from canis, dog; see kwon- in Indo-European roots.]

canary

(kəˈnɛərɪ)
n, pl -naries
1. (Animals) a small finch, Serinus canaria, of the Canary Islands and Azores: a popular cagebird noted for its singing. Wild canaries are streaked yellow and brown, but most domestic breeds are pure yellow
2. (Colours) See canary yellow
3. history Austral a convict
4. archaic a sweet wine from the Canary Islands similar to Madeira
[C16: from Old Spanish canario of or from the Canary Islands]

ca•nar•y

(kəˈnɛər i)

n., pl. -nar•ies.
1. a small, sweetly singing greenish yellow finch, Serinus canaria, of the Canary Islands and vicinity, often a brilliant to pale yellow in varieties bred as cage birds.
2. a light, clear yellow color.
3. Slang. informer (def. 1).
4. a sweet white wine of the Canary Islands.
[1585–95; < Sp (Isla)Canaria]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canary - someone acting as an informer or decoy for the police
betrayer, blabber, informer, squealer, rat - one who reveals confidential information in return for money
2.canary - a female singer
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
3.canary - a moderate yellow with a greenish tinge
yellow, yellowness - yellow color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of sunflowers or ripe lemons
4.canary - any of several small Old World finchescanary - any of several small Old World finches
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
genus Serinus, Serinus - Old World finches; e.g. canaries and serins
common canary, Serinus canaria - native to the Canary Islands and Azores; popular usually yellow cage bird noted for its song
Adj.1.canary - having the color of a canary; of a light to moderate yellow
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Translations
عُصْفور كَناريكَنَاريّ
кaнaрчe
canari
kanárkanárek
kanariefugl
kanario
kanarialintu
kanarinac
kanárikanárimadárkanárisárga
burungkenari
kanarífugl
canarinocanarino domesticocanario
カナリアカナリヤ金糸雀
카나리아
canaria fringilla
kanarėlė
kanārijputniņš
kanárik
kanarček
kanariefågel
นกขมิ้น
chim hoàng yến

canary

[kəˈnɛərɪ]
A. Ncanario m
B. CPD the Canary Islands NPLlas Islas Canarias
canary seed Nalpiste m
canary yellow Namarillo m canario

canary

[kəˈnɛəri] ncanari m, serin m

canary

n
(old, = wine) → Kanarienwein m (old)
(dated US, sl, = female singer) → Sängerin f
attr (colour: also canary yellow) → kanariengelb

canary

[kəˈnɛərɪ] ncanarino

canary

(kəˈneəri) plural caˈnaries noun
a type of small, yellow, singing bird, kept as a pet.

canary

كَنَاريّ kanár kanariefugl Kanarienvogel καναρίνι canario kanarialintu canari kanarinac canarino カナリア 카나리아 kanarie kanarifugl kanarek canário канарейка kanariefågel นกขมิ้น kanarya chim hoàng yến 金丝雀
References in classic literature ?
Feeling very much out of sorts herself, Jo hurried into the parlor to find Beth sobbing over Pip, the canary, who lay dead in the cage with his little claws pathetically extended, as if imploring the food for want of which he had died.
It is time that the good Colonel came forth to greet his friends; else we shall be apt to suspect that he has taken a sip too much of his Canary wine, in his extreme deliberation which cask it were best to broach in honor of the day
Georgiana would chatter nonsense to her canary bird by the hour, and take no notice of me.
I'd as soon put that little canary into the park on a winter's day, as recommend you to bestow your heart on him
Among them I remember a double set of pigs' trotters, a huge pin-cushion, half a bushel or so of apples, a pair of jet earrings, some Spanish onions, a box of dominoes, a canary bird and cage, and a leg of pickled pork.
For, after I had made the monster (out of the refuse of my washerwoman's family) and had clothed him with a blue coat, canary waistcoat, white cravat, creamy breeches, and the boots already mentioned, I had to find him a little to do and a great deal to eat; and with both of those horrible requirements he haunted my existence.
Holy Clerk,'' said the knight, when his hunger was appeased, ``I would gage my good horse yonder against a zecchin, that that same honest keeper to whom we are obliged for the venison has left thee a stoup of wine, or a reinlet of canary, or some such trifle, by way of ally to this noble pasty.
and a Canary called out in a trembling voice to its children, `Come away, my dears
The nut-crackers played at leap-frog, and the slate-pencil ran about the slate; there was such a noise that the canary woke up and began to talk to them, in poetry too
Don Quixote asked the same question of the second, who made no reply, so downcast and melancholy was he; but the first answered for him, and said, "He, sir, goes as a canary, I mean as a musician and a singer.
Try rather to divest yourself of all your rational prejudices, as much as if you were studying the psychology of a canary bird, and only watch the movements of this pretty round creature as she turns her head on one side with an unconscious smile at the ear-rings nestled in the little box.
Her second son would have been provided for at Chesney Wold and would have been made steward in due season, but he took, when he was a schoolboy, to constructing steam-engines out of saucepans and setting birds to draw their own water with the least possible amount of labour, so assisting them with artful contrivance of hydraulic pressure that a thirsty canary had only, in a literal sense, to put his shoulder to the wheel and the job was done.