canon


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ca·ñon

 (kăn′yən)
n. Archaic
Variant of canyon.

can·on 1

 (kăn′ən)
n.
1. An ecclesiastical law or code of laws established by a church council.
2. A secular law, rule, or code of law.
3.
a. An established principle: the canons of polite society.
b. A basis for judgment; a standard or criterion.
4. The books of the Bible officially accepted as Holy Scripture.
5.
a. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field: "the durable canon of American short fiction" (William Styron).
b. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic: the entire Shakespeare canon.
6. Canon The part of the Mass beginning after the Preface and Sanctus and ending just before the Lord's Prayer.
7. The calendar of saints accepted by the Roman Catholic Church.
8. Music A composition or passage in which a melody is imitated by one or more voices at fixed intervals of pitch and time.

[Middle English canoun, from Old English canon and from Old French, both from Latin canōn, rule, from Greek kanōn, measuring rod, rule, of Semitic origin; see qnw in Semitic roots.]

can·on 2

 (kăn′ən)
n.
1. A member of a chapter of priests serving in a cathedral or collegiate church.
2. A member of certain religious communities living under a common rule and bound by vows.

[Middle English canoun, from Norman French canun, from Late Latin canōnicus, one living under a rule, from Latin canōn, rule; see canon1.]

canon

(ˈkænən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a Church decree enacted to regulate morals or religious practices
2. (often plural) a general rule or standard, as of judgment, morals, etc
3. (often plural) a principle or accepted criterion applied in a branch of learning or art
4. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the complete list of the canonized saints
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the prayer in the Mass in which the Host is consecrated
6. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a list of writings, esp sacred writings, officially recognized as genuine
7. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a list of writings, esp sacred writings, officially recognized as genuine
8. (Classical Music) a piece of music in which an extended melody in one part is imitated successively in one or more other parts. See also round31, catch33
9. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a list of the works of an author that are accepted as authentic
10. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (formerly) a size of printer's type equal to 48 point
[Old English, from Latin, from Greek kanōn rule, rod for measuring, standard; related to kanna reed, cane1]

canon

(ˈkænən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) one of several priests on the permanent staff of a cathedral, who are responsible for organizing services, maintaining the fabric, etc
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Also called: canon regular a member of either of two religious orders, the Augustinian or Premonstratensian Canons, living communally as monks but performing clerical duties
[C13: from Anglo-French canunie, from Late Latin canonicus one living under a rule, from canon1]
canonical, canonic adj

cañon

(ˈkænjən)
n
(Physical Geography) a variant spelling of canyon

can•on1

(ˈkæn ən)

n.
1. an ecclesiastical rule or law enacted by a council or other competent authority and, in the Roman Catholic Church, approved by the pope.
2. the body of ecclesiastical law.
3. a body of rules, principles, or standards accepted as axiomatic and universally binding, esp. in a field of study or art.
4. a principle, rule, or standard: the canons of good behavior.
5. the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired.
6. any officially recognized set of sacred books.
7. any comprehensive list of books within a field.
8. the works of an author that have been accepted as authentic.
9. the list of saints acknowledged by the Roman Catholic Church.
10. the part of the mass between the Sanctus and the communion.
11. consistent, note-for-note imitation of one melodic line by another, in which the second line starts after the first.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English < Latin < Greek kanṓn measuring rod, rule]

can•on2

(ˈkæn ən)

n.
1. a member of the chapter of a cathedral or a collegiate church.
2. one of the members (canons regular) of certain Roman Catholic religious orders.
[1150–1200; Middle English; back formation from Old English canōnic (one) under rule < Medieval Latin canōnicus, Latin: of or under rule < Greek kanōnikós. See canon1, -ic]

ca•ñon

(ˈkæn yən)

n.

Canon

 a collection of rules or laws; a set of mathematical tables; a collection or list of books of the Bible accepted as genuine and inspired; any set of sacred books; a piece of music with different parts taking up the same subject successively in strict imitation. See also code.
Examples: canon of laws; of mathematical tables; of monastic rules; of rules; of saints.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canon - a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
prescript, rule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
2.canon - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
prebendary - a canon who receives a prebend for serving the church
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
3.canon - a ravine formed by a river in an area with little rainfall
canyonside - the steeply sloping side of a canyon
North America - a continent (the third largest) in the western hemisphere connected to South America by the Isthmus of Panama
ravine - a deep narrow steep-sided valley (especially one formed by running water)
4.canon - a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon - a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)
5.canon - a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)
6.canon - a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired
sacred scripture, scripture - any writing that is regarded as sacred by a religious group

canon

noun
1. rule, standard, principle, regulation, formula, criterion, dictate, statute, yardstick, precept These measures offended all the accepted canons of political economy.
2. list, index, catalogue, syllabus, roll the body of work which constitutes the canon of English literature as taught in schools

canon

noun
A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
Translations
إتْباعٌ موسيقيشَرْع، قانون كَنَسيقائِمَةٌ بأسْماء القِدّيسينكاهِنٌ في كاتدرائيهكُتُبٌ مُعْتَرَفٌ بِحَقيقَتِها
církevní zákonkánonkanovníkseznam svědců
kanonliste over helgenerregelrettesnorkannik
kanonokszentek
dÿrlingaskrákeîjusöngurlög
autentiški raštaikanauninkaskanonaskanoniniskanonizacija
kanoniķiskanonssvēto saraksts
kánonkanonikzoznam svätcov
kanon
azizler listesiedebî yapılarHristiyan şeriatıkatedral papazıkilise kanunu/nizamı

canon

[ˈkænən]
A. N
1. (Rel etc) (= decree) → canon m; (= rule, norm) → canon m, norma f
2. (= priest) → canónigo m
3. (Mus) → canon m
4. (Literat) [of single author] → bibliografía f autorizada, catálogo m autorizado de obras; (more broadly) → corpus m inv
B. CPD canon law N (Rel) → derecho m canónico

canon

[ˈkænən] n
(= clergyman) → chanoine m
(= standard) [taste, logic, beauty] → canon m

canon

1
n (all senses) → Kanon m

canon

2
n (= priest)Kanoniker m, → Kanonikus m

canon

[ˈkænən] n
a. (clergyman) → canonico
b. (principle) → canone m

canon

(ˈkӕnən) noun
1. a rule (especially of the church).
2. a clergyman belonging to a cathedral.
3. a list of saints.
4. a musical composition in which one part enters after another in imitation.
5. all the writings of an author that are accepted as genuine. the Shakespeare canon.
caˈnonical (-ˈno-) adjective
ˈcanonize, ˈcanonise verb
to place in the list of saints. Joan of Arc was canonized in 1920.
ˌcanoniˈzation, ˌcanoniˈsation noun
References in classic literature ?
The bucket travelled across a box canon three hundred feet deep, and about a third full of water.
She shocked no canon of taste; she was admirably in keeping with herself, and never jarred against surrounding circumstances.
1] Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion, defender of the Oxford movement, and Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
Besides the massive golden signet ring, which marked his ecclesiastical dignity, his fingers, though contrary to the canon, were loaded with precious gems; his sandals were of the finest leather which was imported from Spain; his beard trimmed to as small dimensions as his order would possibly permit, and his shaven crown concealed by a scarlet cap richly embroidered.
The quick travellers came up with the slow, and courteous salutations were exchanged; and one of the new comers, who was, in fact, a canon of Toledo and master of the others who accompanied him, observing the regular order of the procession, the cart, the officers, Sancho, Rocinante, the curate and the barber, and above all Don Quixote caged and confined, could not help asking what was the meaning of carrying the man in that fashion; though, from the badges of the officers, he already concluded that he must be some desperate highwayman or other malefactor whose punishment fell within the jurisdiction of the Holy Brotherhood.
In all the others a single judge presides, and proceeds in general either according to the course of the canon or civil law, without the aid of a jury.
There were five covers laid, three for the Count and Countess and their little daughter; my own, which should have been HIS; and another for the canon of Saint-Denis, who said grace, and then asked:
The letters were upside down to me from where I sat, but Lucy was more opposite to them, so she leant over and read, "Sacred to the memory of George Canon, who died, in the hope of a glorious resurrection, on July 29,1873, falling from the rocks at Kettleness.
Thus if the story adopted by the poet has a strict unity, it must either be concisely told and appear truncated; or, if it conform to the Epic canon of length, it must seem weak and watery.
He was Des Roches le Masle, canon of Notre Dame, who had formerly been valet of a bishop, who introduced him to his Eminence as a perfectly devout man.
The public is informed that on Wednesday, February 23d, being the first day of the Carnival, executions will take place in the Piazza del Popolo, by order of the Tribunal of the Rota, of two persons, named Andrea Rondola, and Peppino, otherwise called Rocca Priori; the former found guilty of the murder of a venerable and exemplary priest, named Don Cesare Torlini, canon of the church of St.
asked the coadjutor; "if your income is lessened I shall be obliged to make you a canon of Notre Dame.