canonical hours


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Related to canonical hours: Liturgy of the Hours

canonical hours

pl.n. Ecclesiastical
1. The times of day, historically including matins, lauds, prime, terce, sext, nones, vespers, and compline, at which canon law prescribes certain prayers to be said.
2. The prayers said at these times.

canonical hours

- The seven canonical hours of the church were called tides, and tide—from an Indo-European root meaning "to divide"—is used with other words to denote a definite interval of time: noontide, Eastertide, eventide, summertide, etc.
See also related terms for tides.
Translations
Stundengebet
References in classic literature ?
All day long, within the canonical hours, the door of Holchester House is perpetually opening to receive visitors.
In addition to the psalms, devotional words such as the "Prayer of Thanksgiving" that opens each of the seven canonical hours of the Coptic daily office, including vespers, still me with their precision:
Edmund of Abingdon had created a meditation on the Passion that brought together "the timing of the day of Passion with the canonical hours," a connection we can see specifically through the De Brailes Hours' captions.
Forcades's first work in English is divided into six parts -- one for each of the five traditional canonical hours, from matins to vespers, plus compline, a final chapter on forgiveness and reconciliation.
Kendrick's book, however, is not a general overview of Holy Week rituals, but rather a study that isolates a genre of Triduum music from roughly 1550-1750: the Canonical Hours of Matins and Lauds, which were performed as a combined service for the days of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.
Maybe this presence is God: the collection is anchored by a crown of sonnets titled "Quarantine" that styles itself as a prayer arranged according to the canonical hours.
Vespers, or evening prayer, is the liturgy of the canonical hours.
All great Christian religious orders observe the Canonical Hours, during which they chant the Divine Office.
At the same time, however, the ten young people either do not celebrate the Lord's Day (Day Three) or they do so only perfunctorily (Day Eight); they conduct their daily activities following the pattern of the seven canonical hours, giving them, however, no religious purposes; and they complete their secular pilgrimage by returning to the same church in Florence without ever acknowledging their gratitude to God for their safe return and without invoking divine protection for their future lives in the plague-ridden city.