cantharidin


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can·thar·i·din

 (kăn-thăr′ĭ-dĭn)
n.
A toxic compound, C10H12O4, that is found in blister beetles and is the active ingredient of Spanish fly.

cantharidin

(ˌkænˈθærɪdɪn)
n
the compound C10H12O4, which is the active ingredient in cantharides and is secreted by many species of blister beetle
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the order Coleoptera, only Meloidae, Oedemeridae and Staphylinidae release vesicant chemicals that cause dermatitis and conjunctivitis (the first two release cantharidin and the latter, pederin).
Silverberg NB, Sidbury R, Mancini AJ: Childhood molluscum contagiosum:Experience with cantharidin therapy in 300 patients.
Cantharidin is found in blister beetles, which feed on alfalfa and other crops that are in horse food.
The discovery that cantharidin inhibits PP5, has led to further research of Protein Phosphatase 5 inhibitors.
4] Bulgakov VP, Tchernoded GK, Mischenko NP, Khodakovskaya MV, Glazunov VP, Radchenko SV, Zvereva EV, Fedoreyev SA & Zhuravlev YN (2002) Effect of salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon and cantharidin on anthraquinone production by Rubia cordifolia callus cultures transformed with the rolB and rolC genes.
Another study in pediatric patients showed that combination therapy with cantharidin and nightly application of imiquimod for 5 weeks resulted in greater than 90% clearing in 12 of 16 (75%) patients.
Stwff o'r enw cantharidin sy'n yr olew, a hwn sy'n codi'r pothelli, ac mae'n medru achosi chwydd ar y croen hefyd.
Attending physicians noted that the symptoms resembled those seen in men who had overindulged in a drug called cantharidin -- popularly known as Spanish fly -- which is extracted from a particular beetle for its purported value as an aphrodisiac.
Lyssa vesicatoria is what was popularly known as 'the Spanish fly', a little bug which exudes a substance called cantharidin when stressed.
In contrast, NR-mediated NO synthesis in spinach was shown to be inhibited by cantharidin (Rockel et al.