cap-and-trade


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cap-and-trade

adj (prenominal)
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) denoting a scheme which allows companies with high greenhouse gas emissions to buy an emission allowance from companies which have fewer emissions, in a bid to reduce the overall impact to the environment
References in periodicals archive ?
Cap-and-trade has long since proven to be environmentally effective and economically cost-effective relative to traditional command and control approaches, the authors note.
The lessons from thirty years of experience suggest that cap-and-trade merits serious consideration when regions, nations, or sub-national jurisdictions seek to develop policies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the authors conclude.
Cap-and-trade policies are becoming a more common market-based instrument for environmental protection, but are they effective?
In their analysis, the authors look at seven different cap-and-trade systems: the U.
In Southern California, a cap-and-trade program known as the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market, or RECLAIM, is being used to control S[O.
X] emissions for 1999 and 2000 were less than half those reported in 1990, before the cap-and-trade system was implemented.
Unlike cap-and-trade programs, neither the overall sectors nor the individual trading sources regulated under an open market trading system are subject to a cap.
Unlike cap-and-trade programs, which are often targeted toward large stationary sources that can be monitored at the stack, open trading is geared toward smaller sources, for example dry cleaners," he explains.
New analysis reveals cap-and-trade would provide windfall profits to politically connected firms, redistribute wealth
expected to reveal a draft of the Senate's climate bill this week, free-market think tank Institute for Energy Research (IER) released a new analysis today outlining how cap-and-trade would precipitate a financial windfall for well-connected special interests and politically-favored companies.
Using implausible assumptions about free emissions allowances, the government's analysis concludes that the costs associated with cap-and-trade legislation are progressive.
Andrew Chamberlain's analysis of the Waxman-Markey bill's cap-and-trade title illustrates just how flawed and skewed this legislation is toward rent-seeking special interests.