cape


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Related to cape: Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope

Cape

 (kāp) or Cape of
For names of actual capes, see the specific element of the names; for example, Hatteras, Cape; Good Hope, Cape of. Other geographic names beginning with Cape are entered under Cape; for example, Cape Town, South Africa; Cape York Peninsula.

cape 1

 (kāp)
n.
1. A sleeveless outer garment fastened at the throat and worn hanging over the shoulders.
2. A brightly colored cloth used in maneuvering the bull in a bullfight; a capote or muleta.
tr.v. caped, cap·ing, capes
To maneuver (the bull) by means of a cape in a bullfight.

[Middle French cape, from Spanish capa (from Late Latin cappa).]

cape 2

 (kāp)
n. Abbr. C.
A point or head of land projecting into a body of water.

[Middle English cap, from Old French, from Old Provençal, from Latin caput, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

cape

(keɪp)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a sleeveless garment like a cloak but usually shorter
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a strip of material attached to a coat or other garment so as to fall freely, usually from the shoulders
[C16: from French, from Provençal capa, from Late Latin cappa; see cap]

cape

(keɪp)
n
(Physical Geography) a headland or promontory
[C14: from Old French cap, from Old Provençal, from Latin caput head]

Cape

(keɪp)
n
1. (Placename) the SW region of South Africa, in Western Cape province
2. (Placename) See Cape of Good Hope

cape1

(keɪp)

n.
a sleeveless garment of variable length, fastened at the neck and falling loosely from the shoulders, worn separately or attached to another garment.
[1350–1400; Old English -cāp (see cope2), reinforced by Sp capa < Late Latin cappa hooded cloak, cope2]

cape2

(keɪp)

n.
1. a piece of land jutting into the sea or some other large body of water; point; headland.
[1350–1400; Middle English cap < Middle French < Old Provençal < Vulgar Latin *capum, for Latin caput head]

cape

(kāp)
A point of land projecting into a body of water.

cape

A pointed mass of land jutting into the sea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cape - a strip of land projecting into a body of watercape - a strip of land projecting into a body of water
dry land, ground, solid ground, terra firma, earth, land - the solid part of the earth's surface; "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"
spit, tongue - a narrow strip of land that juts out into the sea
2.cape - a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shortercape - a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shorter
chlamys - a short mantle or cape fastened at the shoulder; worn by men in ancient Greece
cloak - a loose outer garment
mantelet, mantilla - short cape worn by women
pelisse - a sleeveless cape that is lined or trimmed with fur
tippet - a woman's fur shoulder cape with hanging ends; often consisting of the whole fur of a fox or marten

cape

noun headland, point, head, peninsula, ness (archaic), promontory voyages of exploration round the Cape
Translations
رأس أرضي داخِلِ البحررِداءٌ بِدونِ أكْمام
myspelerína
forbjergkapkappenæs
kabo
niemekeniemiviitta
rt
höfîislá
apmetniszemesrags
pelerína

cape

1 [keɪp]
A. N (Geog) → cabo m
the Cape (= Cape Province) → la provincia del Cabo; (= Cape of Good Hope) → el Cabo de Buena Esperanza
B. CPD Cape Canaveral NCabo m Cañaveral
Cape Cod NCape Cod
Cape Coloureds NPL personas de padres racialmente mixtos (que habitan en la provincia del Cabo)
cape honeysuckle Nmadreselva f siempreviva, bignonia f del Cabo
Cape Horn NCabo m de Hornos
Cape of Good Hope NCabo m de Buena Esperanza
Cape Province NProvincia f del Cabo
Cape Town NEl Cabo, Ciudad f del Cabo
Cape Verde Islands NPLIslas fpl de Cabo Verde

cape

2 [keɪp] N (= garment) → capa f; (short) → capotillo m, esclavina f; [of policeman, cyclist] → chubasquero m (Bullfighting) → capote m

cape

[ˈkeɪp] n
(= garment) → cape f
(= headland) → cap mCape Canaveral [ˈkeɪp kəˈnævərəl] nCap CanaveralCape gooseberry [ˈkeɪp] ngroseille f du Cap

Cape

:
Cape Canaveral
nKap Canaveral nt
Cape Cod
nCape Cod nt
Cape Coloured
nFarbige(r) mf, → Gemischtrassige(r) mf
cape gooseberry
nKapstachelbeere f, → Physalis f
Cape Horn
nKap ntHoorn
Cape of Good Hope
nKap ntder guten Hoffnung

Cape

:
Cape Town
nKapstadt nt
Cape Verde Islands
plKapverdische Inseln pl, → Kapverden pl

cape

1
nCape nt, → Umhang m, → Pelerine f (old)

cape

2
n (Geog) → Kap nt

cape

1 [keɪp] n (Geog) → capo

cape

2 [keɪp] n (garment) → cappa, mantello; (of policeman, cyclist) → mantella

cape1

(keip) noun
a long, loose, sleeveless outer garment hanging from the shoulders and fastening at the neck. a waterproof cycling cape.

cape2

(keip) noun
a headland sticking out into the sea. The fishing-boat rounded the cape; Cape Breton.
References in classic literature ?
If a pedestrian got in her way she drove straight ahead and the frightened citizen had to es- cape as best he could.
Finally they reached the point now known as Cape Gracias-a-Dios, and when they let the anchor go, and found that in a short time it came to rest on the floor of the ocean, some one of the sailors--perhaps Columbus himself-- is said to have remarked:
After bundling her mother up in clothes the neighbours had brought, Antonia put on an old cape from our house and the rabbit-skin hat her father had made for her.
Arobin found her cape and hat, which he brought down and helped her to put on.
A sky-blue coat, with short and broad skirts and low cape, exposed a long, thin neck, and longer and thinner legs, to the worst animadversions of the evil-disposed.
I stuffed a shirt or two into my old carpet-bag, tucked it under my arm, and started for Cape Horn and the Pacific.
He might have carried him round by the way of the Cape of Good Hope.
Then there came up a broad-faced man, dressed in a great gray coat with great gray cape and great white buttons, a gray hat, and a blue comforter loosely tied round his neck; his hair was gray, too; but he was a jolly-looking fellow, and the other men made way for him.
There sat Tom, on a little mossy seat in the court, every one of his button-holes stuck full of cape jessamines, and Eva, gayly laughing, was hanging a wreath of roses round his neck; and then she sat down on his knee, like a chip-sparrow, still laughing.
They say they got it out of the Middle Ages - out of a book - and it is all red and blue and white silks and satins and velvets; tights, trunks, sword, doublet with slashed sleeves, short cape, cap with just one feather in it; I've heard them name these things; they got them out of the book; she's dressed like a page, of old times, they say.
Every projecting grassy cape had its joyous group of naked children, the boys to themselves and the girls to themselves, the latter usually in care of some motherly dame who sat in the shade of a tree with her knitting.
Rub your feet on that braided rug; hang your hat and cape in the entry there as you go past.