capital-intensive


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cap·i·tal-in·ten·sive

(kăp′ĭ-tl-ĭn-tĕn′sĭv)
adj.
Requiring a large expenditure of capital in comparison to labor: a capital-intensive industry.

capital-intensive

adj
(Commerce) requiring the investment of a lot of money

cap′ital-inten′sive



adj.
requiring a large amount of capital, relative to the use of labor. Compare labor-intensive.
[1955–60]
Translations

capital-intensive

[ˌkæpɪtlɪnˈtensɪv] ADJde utilización intensiva de capital

capital-intensive

[ˈkæpɪtlɪnˈtɛnsɪv] adjad alta intensità di capitale
References in periodicals archive ?
This tax system was adequate in the past, when most Ohio businesses were capital-intensive companies.
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One of the things that you see happening right now is a general trend toward consolidation in the industry in favor, of course, of larger, more capital-intensive operations," Houghton says.
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Operations managers in the capital-intensive pulp and paper industry are under pressure to achieve a high return from assets employed.
In contrast to Third World countries, growth economies moved from labor-intensive production to capital-intensive and energy-intensive production.
a pioneer in secure, e-business information exchange for capital-intensive industries, announced that its online publication and portal, Link2Semiconductor.
The company is focusing its energies on the Internet play,'' said DeMattos, ``and divesting away from the capital-intensive side of the business.
CONWAY: The disallowance of the compensation deduction creates a major disparity between industries that are capital-intensive, such as chemicals and pharmaceuticals, and those that are not, such as heavy manufacturers.
The proposed restriction on federal income tax deductibility for these taxes will increase their economic cost to corporations operating in capital tax jurisdictions, thereby increasing the existing incentive to move capital-intensive businesses to jurisdiction where such taxes are not imposed.