capitellum


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Related to capitellum: Panner's disease

cap·i·tel·lum

 (kăp′ĭ-tĕl′əm)
n. pl. cap·i·tel·la (-tĕl′ə) Anatomy
The rounded protuberance at the lower end of the humerus that articulates with the radius.

[Late Latin, diminutive of Latin caput, capit-, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

capitellum

(ˌkæpɪˈtɛləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
(Anatomy) anatomy an enlarged knoblike structure at the end of a bone that forms an articulation with another bone; capitulum
[C19: from Latin, diminutive of capitulum]
Translations

cap·i·tel·lum

n. capitelum.
1. bulbo de un pelo;
2. parte del húmero.
References in periodicals archive ?
Combined shear fractures of the trochlea and capitellum associated with the anterior fracture-dislocation of the elbow.
Examination revealed a swollen and tender elbow, with plain x-ray confirming a subchondral bone disorder (osteochondral defect) of the capitellum.
This year, we enjoyed substantial contributions from the Division of Sports Medicine, with six graduates reviewing topics, including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, bone marrow lesions about the knee, osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, and management of tendinous injuries of the gluteus medius and pectoralis major.
The ligament suffers no injury and is interposed between the dislocated radial head and the capitellum [8].
Panner disease is an osteonchondrosis that affects the capitellum in throwing athletes between the ages of 7 and 12 years, who present with pain and impaired extension of the dominant arm.
The insertion site was selected so that the pin would traverse the lateral portion of the ossified capitellum cross the physis proceed up the lateral column and always engaged the opposite medial cortex proximally.
Pain anywhere in the arc of motion suggests a UCL injury; pain elicited at 45[degrees] of flexion suggests osteochondrosis of the humeral capitellum, while pain closer to frill extension suggests osteochondrosis of the trochlea.
13) It is a focal lesion, usually of the capitellum, which may be due to compressive forces producing arterial insufficiency leading to avascular necrosis.
Any associated damage to the capitellum was noted before internal fixation.
The capitellum and trochlea are distorted due to the angle of the CR.