capitulation


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ca·pit·u·la·tion

 (kə-pĭch′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1. The act of surrendering or giving up: Lack of food and ammunition forced the capitulation of the rebels.
2. A document containing the terms of surrender.
3. An enumeration of the main parts of a subject; a summary.

capitulation

(kəˌpɪtjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
1. the act of capitulating
2. a document containing terms of surrender
3. a statement summarizing the main divisions of a subject
caˈpitulatory adj

ca•pit•u•la•tion

(kəˌpɪtʃ əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of capitulating.
2. the document containing the terms of a surrender.
3. a list of the headings or main divisions of a subject; summary or enumeration.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin]
ca•pit′u•la•to`ry (-ə ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capitulation - a document containing the terms of surrender
document, papers, written document - writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)
2.capitulation - a summary that enumerates the main parts of a topic
summary, sum-up - a brief statement that presents the main points in a concise form; "he gave a summary of the conclusions"
recap, recapitulation, review - a summary at the end that repeats the substance of a longer discussion
3.capitulation - the act of surrendering (usually under agreed conditions); "they were protected until the capitulation of the fort"
loss - the act of losing someone or something; "everyone expected him to win so his loss was a shock"

capitulation

noun surrender, yielding, submission, cave-in (informal) They criticised the government decision as a capitulation to terrorist organisations.

capitulation

noun
The act of submitting or surrendering to the power of another:
Translations
اسْتْسْلام
kapitulace
kapitulationovergivelse
fegyverletételkapituláció
uppgjöf
tesim olma

capitulation

[kəˌpɪtjʊˈleɪʃən] N (Mil, fig) → capitulación f, rendición f

capitulation

[kəˌpɪtʃʊˈleɪʃən] ncapitulation f

capitulation

nKapitulation f

capitulation

[kəˌpɪtjʊˈleɪʃn] ncapitolazione f

capitulate

(kəˈpitjuleit) verb
to surrender usually on agreed conditions. We capitulated to the enemy.
caˌpituˈlation noun
References in classic literature ?
Both mused a little while in silence, when Montcalm renewed the conversation, in a way that showed he believed the visit of his guest was solely to propose terms of capitulation.
The generous usage the Indians had promised before in my capitulation, was afterwards fully complied with, and we proceeded with them as prisoners to old Chelicothe, the principal Indian town, on Little Miami, where we arrived, after an uncomfortable journey, in very severe weather, on the eighteenth day of February, and received as good treatment as prisoners could expect from savages.
On the twenty-eighth of October, 1628, the capitulation was signed.
Astor, at the time of the capitulation with the Northwest Company, completed the series of cross purposes.
But still we must fight on, for though our troops had entered Kadabra, the city was yet far from capitulation, nor had the palace been even assaulted.
Only slowly was this realisation of a capitulation suffused with the flush of passion, only with reflection did they make any personal application.
The newspapers, which were issued about one in the morning contained no particulars of the terms upon which New York had yielded--nor did they give any intimation of the quality of the brief conflict that had preceded the capitulation.
The hosts of Helium would batter at the gates of Manator, the great green warriors of John Carter's savage allies would swarm up from the dead sea bottoms lusting for pillage and for loot, the stately ships of her beloved navy would soar above the unprotected towers and minarets of the doomed city which only capitulation and heavy tribute could then save.
That day they arranged together the preliminaries of the treaty of capitulation.
Esther had already, on one occasion, made good the log tenement of Ishmael against an inroad of savages; and on another, she had been left for dead by her enemies, after a defence that, with a more civilised foe, would have entitled her to the honours of a liberal capitulation.
I did indeed case sometimes with myself what young master aimed at, but thought of nothing but the fine words and the gold; whether he intended to marry me, or not to marry me, seemed a matter of no great consequence to me; nor did my thoughts so much as suggest to me the necessity of making any capitulation for myself, till he came to make a kind of formal proposal to me, as you shall hear presently.
I proposed, therefore, to the governor Spaniard that he should go to them, with Friday's father, and propose to them to remove, and either plant for themselves, or be taken into their several families as servants to be maintained for their labour, but without being absolute slaves; for I would not permit them to make them slaves by force, by any means; because they had their liberty given them by capitulation, as it were articles of surrender, which they ought not to break.