caprice


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ca·price

 (kə-prēs′)
n.
1.
a. An impulsive change of mind: "I find it a relief that plagues and cancers ... are the result of the impartial—and comprehensible—forces of evolution rather than the caprices of a deity" (Olivia Judson).
b. An inclination to change one's mind impulsively: tyrants who rule by caprice.
c. A sudden, unpredictable action or change: the caprices of the wind.
2. Music A capriccio.

[French, from Italian capriccio, from caporiccio, fright, sudden start (originally, "head with the hair standing on end (resembling a hedgehog)", but later influenced by capra, goat, because of goats' frisky movements) : capo, head (from Latin caput; see kaput- in Indo-European roots) + riccio, curly (from Latin ēricius, hedgehog, from ēr).]

caprice

(kəˈpriːs)
n
1. a sudden or unpredictable change of attitude, behaviour, etc; whim
2. a tendency to such changes
3. (Classical Music) another word for capriccio
[C17: from French, from Italian capriccio a shiver, caprice, from capo head + riccio hedgehog, suggesting a convulsive shudder in which the hair stood on end like a hedgehog's spines; meaning also influenced by Italian capra goat, by folk etymology]

ca•price

(kəˈpris)

n.
1. a sudden, unpredictable change, as of one's mind or of the weather; vagary.
2. a tendency to change one's mind without apparent or adequate motive; whimsicality; capriciousness.
[1660–70; < French < Italian; see capriccio]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caprice - a sudden desire; "he bought it on an impulse"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state

caprice

noun whim, notion, impulse, freak, fad, quirk, vagary, whimsy, humour, fancy, fickleness, inconstancy, fitfulness, changeableness Her life was spent in terror of her husband's sudden caprices and mood swings.

caprice

noun
An impulsive, often illogical turn of mind:
Translations
لَحْنٌ موسيقيٌّ مُخالِفٌنَزْوَةٌ، هَوى
capricciorozmar
capricciofiks ideletlivliglunefuldt indfald
capriccio
duttlungurgletta, fjörlegt tónverk
kapričokaprizaskaprizingaskaprizingumasužgaida
kapričokaprīzeuntums
capriccio
kapriçiyokaprismaymun iştahlılıkserbest bestelenmiş şen hafif müzik

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] Ncapricho m, antojo m

caprice

n
Laune(nhaftigkeit) f, → Kaprice f (geh)
(Mus) → Capriccio nt

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] ncapriccio

caprice

(kəˈpriːs) noun
1. an especially unreasonable sudden change of mind etc; a whim. I'm tired of the old man and his caprices.
2. a fanciful and lively piece of music etc.
capricious (kəˈpriʃəs) adjective
changeable. She may change her mind – she's very capricious.
caˈpriciously adverb
caˈpriciousness noun
References in classic literature ?
She made no ineffectual efforts to conduct her household en bonne menagere, going and coming as it suited her fancy, and, so far as she was able, lending herself to any passing caprice.
As to any other kind of discipline, whether addressed to her mind or heart, little Pearl might or might not be within its reach, in accordance with the caprice that ruled the moment.
Weston's nature to imagine that any caprice could be strong enough to affect one so dear, and, as he believed, so deservedly dear.
Ferrars's creation, preserved her from all dependence upon her caprice, or any solicitude for her good opinion.
A reception of finished politeness would probably have confused me: I could not have returned or repaid it by answering grace and elegance on my part; but harsh caprice laid me under no obligation; on the contrary, a decent quiescence, under the freak of manner, gave me the advantage.
her betrays her caprice, yet whose unfinished sketches display
The only difference between a caprice and a lifelong passion is that the caprice lasts a little longer.
Know that Camilla's fortress has surrendered and is ready to submit to my will; and if I have been slow to reveal this fact to thee, it was in order to see if it were some light caprice of hers, or if she sought to try me and ascertain if the love I began to make to her with thy permission was made with a serious intention.
But its real operation is to embarrass the administration, to destroy the energy of the government, and to substitute the pleasure, caprice, or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junto, to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority.
But who can say what experiments may be produced by the caprice of particular States, by the ambition of enterprising leaders, or by the intrigues and influence of foreign powers?
Out of all his past opulence du Bousquier saved only twelve hundred francs a year from an investment in the Grand Livre, which he had happened to place there by pure caprice, and which saved him from penury.
I would not even seek to understand the caprice which had decided Captain Nemo upon entering the gulf.