capricious


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ca·pri·cious

 (kə-prĭsh′əs, -prē′shəs)
adj.
Characterized by, arising from, or subject to caprice; impulsive or unpredictable: capricious decisions; capricious weather.

ca·pri′cious·ly adv.
ca·pri′cious·ness n.

capricious

(kəˈprɪʃəs)
adj
characterized by or liable to sudden unpredictable changes in attitude or behaviour; impulsive; fickle
caˈpriciously adv
caˈpriciousness n

ca•pri•cious

(kəˈprɪʃ əs, -ˈpri ʃəs)

adj.
1. subject to, led by, or indicative of caprice or whim; erratic; mercurial.
2. Obs. fanciful or witty.
[1585–95; < Italian capriccioso; see capriccio, -ous]
ca•pri′cious•ly, adv.
ca•pri′cious•ness, n.
syn: See fickle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.capricious - changeable; "a capricious summer breeze"; "freakish weather"
unpredictable - not capable of being foretold
2.capricious - determined by chance or impulse or whim rather than by necessity or reason; "a capricious refusal"; "authoritarian rulers are frequently capricious"; "the victim of whimsical persecutions"
arbitrary - based on or subject to individual discretion or preference or sometimes impulse or caprice; "an arbitrary decision"; "the arbitrary rule of a dictator"; "an arbitrary penalty"; "of arbitrary size and shape"; "an arbitrary choice"; "arbitrary division of the group into halves"

capricious

capricious

adjective
1. Determined or marked by whim or caprice rather than reason:
Translations
هَوائِيٌّ، مُتَقَلِّبٌ، ذو نَزَوات
náladovározmarná
impulsivlunefuld
duttlungafullur
kaprislimaymun iştahlı

capricious

[kəˈprɪʃəs] ADJcaprichoso, antojadizo

capricious

[kæˈprɪʃəs] adjcapricieux/euse, fantasque

capricious

adjlaunisch, kapriziös (geh)

capricious

[kəˈprɪʃəs] adjcapriccioso/a

caprice

(kəˈpriːs) noun
1. an especially unreasonable sudden change of mind etc; a whim. I'm tired of the old man and his caprices.
2. a fanciful and lively piece of music etc.
capricious (kəˈpriʃəs) adjective
changeable. She may change her mind – she's very capricious.
caˈpriciously adverb
caˈpriciousness noun
References in classic literature ?
She felt excited and strange, and not knowing what else to do, followed a capricious impulse, and, withdrawing her hands, said petulantly, "I don't choose.
The dark green of the branches stood out and glistened against the white muslin curtains which draped the windows, and which puffed, floated, and flapped at the capricious will of a stiff breeze that swept up from the Gulf.
The half a dozen cabins scattered along the banks of the North Fork, as if by some overflow of that capricious river, had become augmented during a week of fierce excitement by twenty or thirty others, that were huddled together on the narrow gorge of Devil's Spur, or cast up on its steep sides.
She took her mother's hand in both her own, and gazed into her eyes with an earnestness that was seldom seen in her wild and capricious character.
In the fullness of their revelry, they fluttered, chirping and frolicking from bush to bush, and tree to tree, capricious from the very profusion and variety around them.
For however eagerly and impetuously the savage crew had hailed the announcement of his quest; yet all sailors of all sorts are more or less capricious and unreliable --they live in the varying outer weather, and they inhale its fickleness --and when retained for any object remote and blank in the pursuit, however promissory of life and passion in the end, it is above all things requisite that temporary interests and employment should intervene and hold them healthily suspended for the final dash.
Their tawny features, now all begrimed with smoke and sweat, their matted beards, and the contrasting barbaric brilliancy of their teeth, all these were strangely revealed in the capricious emblazonings of the works.
She was merely his chattel now, his convenience, his dog, his cringing and helpless slave, the humble and unresisting victim of his capricious temper and vicious nature.
The aunt was a capricious woman, and governed her husband entirely; but it was not in Mr.
I remember her as a slim young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle or justice: still, such as she was, I preferred her to any one else at Gateshead Hall.
Here, trusting for their future security to certain sand-hills which the capricious waves have thrown up to encourage them, the people of Aldborough have boldly established their quaint little watering-place.
Every town-gate and village taxing-house had its band of citizen- patriots, with their national muskets in a most explosive state of readiness, who stopped all comers and goers, cross-questioned them, inspected their papers, looked for their names in lists of their own, turned them back, or sent them on, or stopped them and laid them in hold, as their capricious judgment or fancy deemed best for the dawning Republic One and Indivisible, of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death.