caps


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cap 1

 (kăp)
n.
1. A usually soft and close-fitting head covering, either having no brim or with a visor.
2.
a. A special head covering worn to indicate rank, occupation, or membership in a particular group: a cardinal's cap; a sailor's cap.
b. An academic mortarboard. Used especially in the phrase cap and gown.
3.
a. A protective cover or seal, especially one that closes off an end or a tip: a bottle cap; a 35-millimeter lens cap.
b. A crown for covering or sealing a tooth.
c. A truck cap.
d. A tread for a worn pneumatic tire.
e. A fitted covering used to seal a well or large pipe.
f. Chiefly Southern US See eye.
4. A summit or top, as of a mountain.
5. An upper limit; a ceiling: placed a cap on mortgage rates.
6. Architecture The capital of a column.
7. Botany
a. The top part, or pileus, of a mushroom.
b. A calyptra.
8.
a. A percussion cap.
b. A small explosive charge enclosed in paper for use in a toy gun.
9. Any of several sizes of writing paper, such as foolscap.
10. Sports An appearance by a player in an international soccer game, traditionally rewarded with a hat.
tr.v. capped, cap·ping, caps
1. To cover, protect, or seal with a cap.
2. To award a special cap to as a sign of rank or achievement: capped the new women nurses at graduation.
3. To lie over or on top of; cover: hills capped with snow.
4. To apply the finishing touch to; complete: cap a meal with dessert.
5. To follow with something better; surpass or outdo: capped his last trick with a disappearing act that brought the audience to its feet.
6. To set an upper limit on: decided to cap cost-of-living increases.
Idioms:
cap in hand
Humbly or submissively.
set (one's) cap for
To attempt to attract and win as a mate.

[Middle English cappe, from Old English cæppe, from Late Latin cappa.]

cap 2

 (kăp) Informal
n.
A capital letter.
tr.v. capped, cap·ping, caps
To capitalize.

[Shortened form of capital.]

cap 3

n. Informal
1. Capital: venture cap.
2. Capitalization: market cap.

CAP

abbr.
1. Civil Air Patrol
2. combat air patrol

caps.

capital letters.
Translations

caps

[kæps] NPL ABBR (Typ) =capitals, capital lettersmay
References in classic literature ?
Yes," replied the man; "but will your worship make him show the five caps he has made me?
With all my heart," said the tailor; and drawing his hand from under his cloak he showed five caps stuck upon the five fingers of it, and said, "there are the caps this good man asks for; and by God and upon my conscience I haven't a scrap of cloth left, and I'll let the work be examined by the inspectors of the trade.
Nine-tenths of the Heidelberg students wore no badge or uniform; the other tenth wore caps of various colors, and belonged to social organizations called "corps.
A good many of them wore colored caps of the corps.
Almost every time a new carriage drove up a whisper ran through the crowd and caps were doffed.
As the light gleamed among them, Sam saw that they were five stout, desperate-looking fellows, in red woolen caps, with a leader in a three-cornered hat, and that some of them were armed with dirks, or long knives, and pistols.
Once she gave her a little cap of red velvet, which suited her so well that she would never wear anything else; so she was always called 'Little Red- Cap.
Then she noticed Dorothy's Golden Cap, and said, "Why don't you use the charm of the Cap, and call the Winged Monkeys to you?
It was a warm evening, and even in the delightful drawing-room, where the fine old turf sloped from the open window towards a lilied pool and well-planted mounds, the heat was enough to make Celia in her white muslin and light curls reflect with pity on what Dodo must feel in her black dress and close cap.
Shimerda, wearing his rabbit-skin cap and collar, and new mittens his wife had knitted.
As for that swab, he's good and dead, he is," he added, indicating the man with the red cap.
The fellow was brought, cap in hand, and the other fellows closed round to look and listen, in the manner of the people at the Paris fountain.