captured


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cap·ture

 (kăp′chər)
tr.v. cap·tured, cap·tur·ing, cap·tures
1.
a. To take captive, as by force or craft; seize.
b. To gain possession or control of, as in a game or contest: capture the queen in chess; captured the liberal vote.
2.
a. To attract and hold: tales of adventure that capture the imagination.
b. Astronomy To attract and pull (a celestial body) into orbit by gravitation.
3. To succeed in preserving in lasting form: capture a likeness in a painting.
n.
1. The act of catching, taking, or winning, as by force or skill.
2. One that has been seized, caught, or won; a catch or prize.
3. Astronomy The process by which a massive body, such as a star or planet, draws and holds another body in gravitational orbit.
4. Physics The phenomenon in which an atom or a nucleus absorbs a subatomic particle, often with the subsequent emission of radiation.

[From French, capture, from Old French, from Latin captūra, a catching of animals, from captus, past participle of capere, to seize; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

captured

References in classic literature ?
The scout shook his head, and muttering some unintelligible words, among which "throat" and "Iroquois" were alone audible, he walked away, to collect and to examine into the state of the captured arsenal of the Hurons.
Some seem to have but one vulnerable point, or door of access; while others have a thousand avenues, and may be captured in a thousand different ways.
They first caught crabs and quohogs in the sand; grown bolder, they waded out with nets for mackerel; more experienced, they pushed off in boats and captured cod; and at last, launching a navy of great ships on the sea, explored this watery world; put an incessant belt of circumnavigations round it; peeped in at Behring's Straits; and in all seasons and all oceans declared everlasting war with the mightiest animated mass that has survived the flood; most monstrous and most mountainous
And though all hands commonly disdained the capture of those inferior creatures; and though the Pequod was not commissioned to cruise for them at all, and though she had passed numbers of them near the Crozetts without lowering a boat; yet now that a Sperm Whale had been brought alongside and beheaded, to the surprise of all, the announcement was made that a Right Whale should be captured that day, if opportunity offered.
MAINLY the Round Table talk was monologues -- narrative accounts of the adventures in which these prisoners were captured and their friends and backers killed and stripped of their steeds and armor.
In ordinary times the thief and the horse would soon be captured.
In New York these performances would have gathered a mighty crowd of curious and intensely interested spectators; but here it only captured an audience of half a dozen little boys who stood in a row across the pavement, some with their school-knapsacks on their backs and their hands in their pockets, others with arms full of bundles, and all absorbed in the show.
Whenever we see any- body coming we can tie Jim hand and foot with a rope, and lay him in the wigwam and show this handbill and say we captured him up the river, and were too poor to travel on a steamboat, so we got this little raft on credit from our friends and are going down to get the reward.
Horsemen had departed down all the roads in every direction, and the Sheriff "was confident" that he would be captured before night.
Regardless of this warning, she captured his closed hand and its contents again.