caravan


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car·a·van

 (kăr′ə-văn′)
n.
1. A company of travelers journeying together, as across a desert or through hostile territory.
2. A single file of vehicles or pack animals.
3. A large covered vehicle; a van.
4. Chiefly British A trailer or dwelling place on wheels.

[French caravane or Italian carovana, both from Persian kārvān.]

caravan

(ˈkærəˌvæn)
n
1.
a. a large enclosed vehicle capable of being pulled by a car or lorry and equipped to be lived in. US and Canadian name: trailer
b. (as modifier): a caravan site.
2. (esp in some parts of Asia and Africa) a company of traders or other travellers journeying together, often with a train of camels, through the desert
3. a group of wagons, pack mules, camels, etc, esp travelling in single file
4. a large covered vehicle, esp a gaily coloured one used by Romany Gypsies, circuses, etc
vb, -vans, -vanning or -vanned
(intr) Brit to travel or have a holiday in a caravan
[C16: from Italian caravana, from Persian kārwān]
ˈcaraˌvanning n

car•a•van

(ˈkær əˌvæn)

n., v. -vaned -vanned, -van•ing -van•ning. n.
1. a group of travelers journeying together for safety, as through deserts, hostile territory, etc.
2. any group traveling in or as if in a caravan, as pack animals or vehicles.
3. a large covered vehicle conveying passengers, goods, etc.; van.
4. Chiefly Brit. house trailer.
v.t.
5. to carry in or as if in a caravan.
v.i.
6. to travel in or as if in a caravan.
[1590–1600; Italian carovana < Persian kārwān]

Caravan

 a number of people travelling together; a moving company; a fleet of merchant ships. See also cafila, convoy.
Examples: caravan of camels, 1601; of merchants, 1602; of pilgrims; of merchant ships; of travellers, 1599; an aerie caravan [birds], 1667.

caravan


Past participle: caravanned
Gerund: caravanning

Imperative
caravan
caravan
Present
I caravan
you caravan
he/she/it caravans
we caravan
you caravan
they caravan
Preterite
I caravanned
you caravanned
he/she/it caravanned
we caravanned
you caravanned
they caravanned
Present Continuous
I am caravanning
you are caravanning
he/she/it is caravanning
we are caravanning
you are caravanning
they are caravanning
Present Perfect
I have caravanned
you have caravanned
he/she/it has caravanned
we have caravanned
you have caravanned
they have caravanned
Past Continuous
I was caravanning
you were caravanning
he/she/it was caravanning
we were caravanning
you were caravanning
they were caravanning
Past Perfect
I had caravanned
you had caravanned
he/she/it had caravanned
we had caravanned
you had caravanned
they had caravanned
Future
I will caravan
you will caravan
he/she/it will caravan
we will caravan
you will caravan
they will caravan
Future Perfect
I will have caravanned
you will have caravanned
he/she/it will have caravanned
we will have caravanned
you will have caravanned
they will have caravanned
Future Continuous
I will be caravanning
you will be caravanning
he/she/it will be caravanning
we will be caravanning
you will be caravanning
they will be caravanning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been caravanning
you have been caravanning
he/she/it has been caravanning
we have been caravanning
you have been caravanning
they have been caravanning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been caravanning
you will have been caravanning
he/she/it will have been caravanning
we will have been caravanning
you will have been caravanning
they will have been caravanning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been caravanning
you had been caravanning
he/she/it had been caravanning
we had been caravanning
you had been caravanning
they had been caravanning
Conditional
I would caravan
you would caravan
he/she/it would caravan
we would caravan
you would caravan
they would caravan
Past Conditional
I would have caravanned
you would have caravanned
he/she/it would have caravanned
we would have caravanned
you would have caravanned
they would have caravanned

caravan

trailer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caravan - a procession (of wagons or mules or camels) traveling together in single filecaravan - a procession (of wagons or mules or camels) traveling together in single file; "we were part of a caravan of almost a thousand camels"; "they joined the wagon train for safety"
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
Conestoga, Conestoga wagon, covered wagon, prairie schooner, prairie wagon - a large wagon with broad wheels and an arched canvas top; used by the United States pioneers to cross the prairies in the 19th century
2.caravan - a camper equipped with living quarterscaravan - a camper equipped with living quarters
camping bus, motor home, camper - a recreational vehicle equipped for camping out while traveling
Verb1.caravan - travel in a caravan
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
Translations
عَرَبَةٌ مُتَنَقِّلَةٌ مَجْرورَهقافلةقافِلَهمَقْطُورَة
karavankaravanamaringotkapřívěs
karavanecampingvognbeboelsesvogn
karavano
asuntovaunukaravaanimatkailuvaunu
kamp kućicakaravankaravana
karaván
hjólhÿsivagnlest
トレーラーハウス
트레일러 하우스
karavanaspoilsinė ant ratųvilkstinė
autopiekabekaravānaore
karavána
karavanastanovanjska prikolica
husvagn
รถคาราวาน
xe moóc caravan

caravan

[ˈkærəvæn]
A. N
1. (Brit) (Aut) → remolque m, caravana f, tráiler m (LAm); (gipsies') → carromato m
2. (in desert) → caravana f
B. VI to go caravanningir de vacaciones en una caravana
C. CPD caravan site Ncamping m para caravanas

caravan

[ˈkærəvæn] n (for holidays)caravane fcaravan site n (British)camping m pour caravanes

caravan

n
(Brit Aut) → Wohnwagen m, → Caravan m; caravan holidayFerien plim Wohnwagen
(= gipsy caravan)Zigeunerwagen m
(= desert caravan)Karawane f

caravan

[ˈkærəˌvæn]
1. n
a. (gipsies') → carrozzone m (Brit) (Aut) → roulotte f inv
b. (in desert) → carovana
2. viviaggiare con la roulotte

caravan

(ˈkӕrəvӕn) noun
1. a vehicle on wheels for living in, now pulled by car etc, formerly by horse. a holiday caravan; a gypsy caravan.
2. a group of people travelling together for safety especially across a desert on camels. a caravan of merchants.

caravan

مَقْطُورَة karavan karavane Wohnwagen τροχόσπιτο caravana asuntovaunu caravane kamp kućica roulotte トレーラーハウス 트레일러 하우스 caravan campingvogn przyczepa kempingowa roulotte, trailer фургон husvagn รถคาราวาน karavan xe moóc caravan 旅游房车
References in classic literature ?
The great fish, reversing his experience with the prophet of Nineveh, immediately began his progress down the same red pathway of fate whither so varied a caravan had preceded him.
Should you ever be athirst in the great American desert, try this experiment, if your caravan happen to be supplied with a metaphysical professor.
And who could tell whether, in that congregated caravan, Moby Dick himself might not temporarily be swimming, like the worshipped white-elephant in the coronation procession of the Siamese
When he comes about nine-thirty to inspect us for the night, we will seize him, gag him, batter him, and early in the morning we will march out of this town, proprietors of this caravan of slaves.
He took his hot toast and coffee, and then about half past three his caravan of ten men filed away from the Riffel Hotel, and began the steep climb.
But, there was recompense in the joy with which Herbert would come home of a night and tell me of these changes, little imagining that he told me no news, and would sketch airy pictures of himself conducting Clara Barley to the land of the Arabian Nights, and of me going out to join them (with a caravan of camels, I believe), and of our all going up the Nile and seeing wonders.
In fact, for a couple of hours I met nothing worth mentioning, male or female, with the exception of a gipsy caravan, which I suppose was both; but it was a poor show.
Travelling hard all night, we found ourselves next morning past the plain; but the road we were in was not more commodious, the points of the rocks pierced our feet; to increase our perplexities we were alarmed with the approach of an armed troop, which our fear immediately suggested to be the Galles, who chiefly beset these passes of the mountains; we put ourselves on the defensive, and expected them, whom, upon a more exact examination, we found to be only a caravan of merchants come as usual to fetch salt.
At the head of the caravan rode some two hundred warriors, five abreast, and a like number brought up the rear, while twenty-five or thirty outriders flanked us on either side.
The spoor was but a couple of days old when the two discovered it, which meant that the slow-moving caravan was but a few hours distant from them whose trained and agile muscles could carry their bodies swiftly through the branches above the tangled undergrowth which had impeded the progress of the laden carriers of the white men.
Besides, the appearance of the caravan was formidable.
The little caravan dismounted in order to pass Les Ecores, a cliff that overhangs the bay, and a few minutes later, at the end of the dock, they entered the yard of the Golden Lamb, an inn kept by Mother David.