carbon


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Related to carbon: carbon cycle, graphite, hydrogen

car·bon

 (kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

[French carbone, from Latin carbō, carbōn-, a coal, charcoal; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.

carbon

(ˈkɑːbən)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds)
a. a nonmetallic element existing in the three crystalline forms: graphite, diamond, and buckminsterfullerene: occurring in carbon dioxide, coal, oil, and all organic compounds. The isotope carbon-12 has been adopted as the standard for atomic wt; carbon-14, a radioisotope with a half-life of 5700 years, is used in radiocarbon dating and as a tracer. Symbol: C; atomic no: 6; atomic wt: 12.011; valency: 2, 3, or 4; relative density: 1.8–2.1 (amorphous), 1.9–2.3 (graphite), 3.15–3.53 (diamond); sublimes at 3367±25°C; boiling pt: 4827°C
b. (as modifier): a carbon compound.
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) short for carbon paper, carbon copy
3. (Electrical Engineering) a carbon electrode used in a carbon-arc light or in carbon-arc welding
4. (Electrical Engineering) a rod or plate, made of carbon, used in some types of battery
[C18: from French carbone, from Latin carbō charcoal, dead or glowing coal]
ˈcarbonous adj

car•bon

(ˈkɑr bən)

n.
1. a nonmetallic element found combined with other elements in all organic matter and in a pure state as diamond and graphite. Symbol: C; at. wt.: 12.011; at. no.: 6; sp. gr.: (of diamond) 3.51 at 20°C; (of graphite) 2.26 at 20°C.
3. a sheet of carbon paper.
4.
a. the current-bearing carbon rod used in arc lights and in welding.
b. the rod or plate, composed in part of carbon, used in batteries.
[1780–90; < French carbone, coinage based on Latin carbōn-, s. of carbō charcoal]
car′bon•less, adj.

car·bon

(kär′bən)
Symbol C A naturally abundant, nonmetallic element that occurs in all organic compounds and can be found in all living things. Diamonds and graphite are pure forms, and carbon is a major part of coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Carbon can bond to itself and forms an enormous number of important molecules, many of which are essential for life. Atomic number 6. See Periodic Table.
Did You Know? Proteins, sugars, fats, and even DNA all contain many carbon atoms. The element carbon is also important, however, outside the chemistry of living things. The two most familiar forms of carbon—diamond and graphite—differ greatly because of the arrangement of their atoms. In diamond, each carbon atom bonds to four others in a dense network that makes the material the hardest substance known. But in graphite, each carbon atom bonds only to three others in a much looser arrangement of layers, each of which is weakly bonded to neighboring layers. Because individual layers of carbon in graphite are so loosely connected, they are easily scraped away, which is why it is used as pencil "lead" for writing. In 1985 an entirely new form of carbon was discovered in which carbon atoms join to make a sphere called a buckminsterfullerene or buckyball, after Buckminster Fuller, who created buildings with a similar appearance. Scientists are currently looking for uses for buckyballs and tubes made from them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbon - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamondcarbon - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
carbon 14, radiocarbon - a radioactive isotope of carbon
char - a charred substance
charcoal, wood coal - a carbonaceous material obtained by heating wood or other organic matter in the absence of air
carbon black, crock, lampblack, smut, soot - a black colloidal substance consisting wholly or principally of amorphous carbon and used to make pigments and ink
activated carbon, activated charcoal - powdered or granular carbon used for purifying by adsorption; given orally (as a slurry) it is an antidote for some kinds of poisons
black lead, graphite, plumbago - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactors
coal - fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period
adamant, diamond - very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem
limestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animals
crude, crude oil, fossil oil, petroleum, rock oil, oil - a dark oil consisting mainly of hydrocarbons
2.carbon - a thin paper coated on one side with a dark waxy substance (often containing carbon); used to transfer characters from the original to an under sheet of paper
paper - a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
3.carbon - a copy made with carbon paper
copy - a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing; "she made a copy of the designer dress"; "the clone was a copy of its ancestor"
Translations
koolstof
كربونكَرْبُونكربون، فَحْم
въглеродкопие
carboni
uhlíkkopírákuhlí
kulstofcarbonkarbonkul
karbono
süsisüsinik
کربن
hiilihiilidioksidikopsu
कार्बन
ugljikugalj
szén
carbon
karbon
kolefni
炭素
탄소
carbonium
angliskalkėkopijaanglies dvideginisanglies viendeginis
ogleklisogle
കാര്‍ബണ്‍
koolstofkoolstofdioxidekool
carbon
uhlík
ogljik
ugljenikугљеник
kolkoldioxid
kaboni
คาร์บอน
вуглець
cacboncácbongiấy thanthanthan củi

carbon

[ˈkɑːbən]
A. N
1. (Chem) → carbono m
2. (Elec) → carbón m
3. (= carbon paper) → papel m de calco, papel m carbón, papel m carbónico (S. Cone)
B. CPD carbon copy N (typing) → copia f hecha con papel de carbón (fig) → vivo retrato m
he's a carbon copy of my unclees el vivo retrato de mi tío, es calcado a mi tío
carbon credit Ncrédito m de carbono
carbon dating Ndatación f utilizando carbono 14
carbon dioxide Nbióxido m de carbono
carbon fibre Nfibra f de carbono
carbon monoxide Nmonóxido m de carbono
carbon paper Npapel m de calco, papel m carbón, papel m carbónico (S. Cone)
carbon ribbon Ncinta f mecanográfica de carbón
carbon tetrachloride Ntetracloruro m de carbono

carbon

[ˈkɑːrbən] ncarbone m

carbon

n (Chem) → Kohlenstoff m; (Elec) → Kohle f

carbon

:
carbon copy
nDurchschlag m; to be a carbon of somethingdas genaue Ebenbild einer Sache (gen)sein; she’s a carbon of her sistersie sieht ihrer Schwester zum Verwechseln ähnlich
carbon dating
carbon dioxide
nKohlendioxid nt
carbon fibre
nKohlenstoffaser f

carbon

:
carbonless paper
nselbstdurchschreibendes Papier
carbon monoxide
nKohlenmonoxid nt
carbon paper
nKohlepapier nt
carbon ribbon
nKohlefarbband nt

carbon

[ˈkɑːbən] n (Chem) → carbonio (also carbon paper) → carta carbone

carbon

(ˈkaːbən)
an element occurring as diamond and graphite and also in coal etc.
carbon copy
a copy of writing or typing made by means of carbon paper.
carbon dioxide (daiˈoksaid)
a gas present in the air, breathed out by man and other animals.
carbon monoxide (məˈnoksaid)
a colourless, very poisonous gas which has no smell. Carbon monoxide is given off by car engines.
carbon paper
a type of paper coated with carbon etc which makes a copy when placed between the sheets being written or typed.

carbon

كَرْبُون uhlík kulstof Kohlenstoff άνθρακας carbono hiili carbone ugljik carbonio 炭素 탄소 koolstof karbon węgiel carbono углерод kol คาร์บอน karbon cácbon

car·bon

n. carbono;
___ dioxidedióxido de ___;
___ monoxidemonóxido de ___;
___ tetrachloridetetracloruro carbónico.

carbon

n (element) carbono; — dioxide dióxido de carbono; — monoxide monóxido de carbono; — tetrachloride tetracloruro de carbono
References in classic literature ?
Edison greatly improved it by using soft carbon instead of a steel point.
The diamond is contained in the carbon, gold is in the fire.
He was in consumption, as so many were in that region, and he carbonized against it, as he said; he took his carbon in the liquid form, and the last time I saw him the carbon had finally prevailed over the consumption, but it had itself become a seated vice; that was many years since, and it is many years since he died.
So long as the excess of carbon dioxide in the blood was not sufficient to prevent heart action, the rykor would suffer only a diminution of vitality; but would still respond to the exciting agency of the kaldane's brain.
How to get rid of our excessive carbon dioxide without unduly wasting our oxygen is a delicate and vital question," said Challenger, looking round him after the five iron tubes had been laid side by side against the wall.
My dear, the passengers on that train were no more animate than the coals into which they crashed or the carbon which they have now become," said Challenger, stroking her hand soothingly.
Martin gathered together a number of carbon copies of his short stories, hesitated a moment, then added his "Sea Lyrics.
The mush was half cooked and mostly burnt, the bacon was charred carbon, and the coffee was unspeakable.
If I were a chemist, I would tell him that the aerolites, bodies evidently formed exteriorly of our terrestrial globe, have, upon analysis, revealed indisputable traces of carbon, a substance which owes its origin solely to organized beings, and which, according to the experiments of Reichenbach, must necessarily itself have been endued with animation.
But reaching the federal standard for carbon monoxide is an important milestone and one that Southern California will have to maintain over the next few years to keep from going back on the list of areas that fail to meet carbon monoxide standards.
Many scientists see sequestering carbon in biotic "sinks" such as forests and farmlands in the terrestrial biosphere as a win--win proposition for the environment--"a way to improve the atmosphere while doing things you ought to be doing anyway, like protecting natural resources and promoting sustainable development," says Gregg Marland, a research scientist and expert in carbon sequestration at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.
Driving the creative trade is concern over climate changes caused by the uncontrolled burning of fossil fuels, like gas and oil, which release heat-trapping carbon dioxide and other "greenhouse gases.