carbon monoxide


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Related to carbon monoxide: carbon monoxide poisoning

carbon monoxide

n.
A colorless, odorless, highly poisonous gas, CO, formed by the incomplete combustion of carbon or a carbonaceous material, such as gasoline.

carbon monoxide

n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless odourless poisonous flammable gas formed when carbon compounds burn in insufficient air and produced by the action of steam on hot carbon: used as a reducing agent in metallurgy and as a fuel. Formula: CO

car′bon monox′ide


n.
a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas, CO, produced when carbon burns with insufficient air: used chiefly in organic synthesis and metallurgy.
[1870–75]

carbon monoxide

A colorless, odorless gas, CO, formed when a compound containing carbon burns incompletely because there is not enough oxygen. It is present in the exhaust gases of automobile engines and is very poisonous.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbon monoxide - an odorless very poisonous gas that is a product of incomplete combustion of carboncarbon monoxide - an odorless very poisonous gas that is a product of incomplete combustion of carbon
monoxide - an oxide containing just one atom of oxygen in the molecule
Translations
أوَّل أكسيد الكربون
oxid uhelnatý
kulilte
KohlenmonoxydKohlenstoffmonoxid
häkähiilimonoksidi
szén-monoxid
kolsÿringur
monoxeidium carbonicum
oxid uhoľnatý
kolmonoxidkoloxid
karbonmonoksit

carbon monoxide

nmonossido di carbonio

carbon

(ˈkaːbən)
an element occurring as diamond and graphite and also in coal etc.
carbon copy
a copy of writing or typing made by means of carbon paper.
carbon dioxide (daiˈoksaid)
a gas present in the air, breathed out by man and other animals.
carbon monoxide (məˈnoksaid)
a colourless, very poisonous gas which has no smell. Carbon monoxide is given off by car engines.
carbon paper
a type of paper coated with carbon etc which makes a copy when placed between the sheets being written or typed.
References in periodicals archive ?
By installing a carbon monoxide alarm and testing it regularly, we can all take a simple but important step in keeping our homes safe.
Snyder declaring October 18-24 as Carbon Monoxide Safety and Awareness Week in Michigan.
Sutton Police and Fire Departments and the state Department of Fire Services continue to investigate an incident last week at a home on McGuire Road where high carbon monoxide levels were detected.
It's estimated that more than 4,000 people in the UK attend A&E departments each year because of carbon monoxide poisoning, with at least 40 dying from it.
Appliances that use fossil fuel coal, gas, oil or wood can produce carbon monoxide, a difficult to detect colourless, odourless and tasteless gas which can cause sudden collapse, loss of consciousness and death.
All new solid fuel appliance installations must include a carbon monoxide detector but gas appliances and older stoves and fires do not require one by law.
Carbon monoxide poisoning can have a devastating effect and the more people are aware of the signs and symptoms, especially at the initial stages, the more chance we have of preventing avoidable deaths and injuries.
The findings are concerning, the study's authors wrote, because carbon monoxide poisoning is linked to 500 accidental deaths yearly and a higher risk for brain injury.
Her attack comes after Northern Ireland this week became the first UK region to make carbon monoxide alarms a legal requirement in all new homes.
It reveals that under 45 per cent of homeowners say they have a carbon monoxide (CO) detector installed in their property - this is less than half the number who have a smoke alarm in their home (97 per cent).
A THE problem with carbon monoxide is you can't see it, you can't taste it, and you can't smell it.
A fifth of locals are also unaware that carbon monoxide can kill and only 15 per cent realise that it can cause brain damage.