carbon tax

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carbon tax

n
(Environmental Science) a tax on the emissions caused by the burning of coal, gas, and oil, aimed at reducing the production of greenhouse gases
References in periodicals archive ?
provide an overview of the carbon tax developments around the world, including introducing various country experiences with the design and implementation of carbon taxes.
Two years ago, Australia's Abbott and his liberty-minded Liberal Party secured a landslide victory against the Big Government-promoting Labor Party and its deeply unpopular carbon taxes.
Revenue generated by carbon taxes could be used for a variety of purposes.
leaders can learn valuable lessons in rejecting defacto carbon taxes and onerous renewable standards.
There were also a number of subnational regimes (such as the carbon taxes in British Columbia and Quebec).
But he said that to keep the Earth's temperature from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius by 2100 would require a massive increase in carbon taxes, from their current level of around $68 per ton to $4,000 per ton.
There are various forms of carbon taxes already in effect around the world.
The official announcement on carbon tax is awaited in the New Year, and only time will tell how industry will respond to the imminent implications of carbon taxes to long term strategies.
This volume from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) provides policy makers with practical guidelines for the design and implementation of climate change mitigation policies, illustrating that fiscal instruments, namely carbon taxes and their cap-and-trade equivalents, can be the focus of policies to reduce energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, and that these pricing policies can become a new source of government revenue.
MONEY raised from carbon taxes on energy bills should be used to lift millions of households out of fuel poverty and boost the economy, it has been suggested.
Euro for euro, dollar for dollar, yen for yen, energy and carbon taxes have a lower negative impact on a nation's economy, consumption and jobs than income tax and VAT.
Revenue from carbon taxes, these economists say, could go toward paying off the debt or offseting reductions in tax rates to stimulate economic activity.