carcinogen


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car·cin·o·gen

 (kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

carcinogen

(kɑːˈsɪnədʒən; ˈkɑːsɪnəˌdʒɛn)
n
(Pathology) pathol any substance that produces cancer
[C20: from Greek karkinos cancer + -gen]
ˌcarcinoˈgenic adj
ˌcarcinogenˈicity n

car•cin•o•gen

(kɑrˈsɪn ə dʒən)

n.
any substance or agent that tends to produce a cancer.
[1935–40; carcino (ma) + -gen]
car`cin•o•gen•ic (-sə nəˈdʒɛn ɪk) adj.
car`ci•no•ge•nic′i•ty (-dʒəˈnɪs ɪ ti) n.

car·cin·o·gen

(kär-sĭn′ə-jən)
A substance or agent that can cause cancer. Asbestos and tobacco products are examples of carcinogens.

carcinogen

any natural or artificial substance that can produce or trigger cancer, as arsenic, asbestos, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet rays, x rays, and many derivatives of coal tar. — carcinogenic, adj.
See also: Cancer

carcinogen

Any cancer-causing agent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcinogen - any substance that produces cancercarcinogen - any substance that produces cancer  
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
Translations

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒen] Ncarcinógeno m

carcinogen

[kɑːrˈsɪnədʒən] nsubstance f cancérigène

carcinogen

nKrebserreger m, → Karzinogen nt

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒən] n (Med) → cancerogeno

car·cin·o·gen

n. carcinógeno, cualquier sustancia que puede producir cáncer.

carcinogen

n carcinógeno, cancerígeno, sustancia que causa cáncer
References in periodicals archive ?
Ortho-toluidine--used to make rubber chemicals, pesticides, and dyes --has been reevaluated and now is listed as a known human carcinogen.
The added carcinogen exposure from diesel generators is similar to that of smoking a few cigarettes per day," according to a briefing on study.
An article published in Carcinogenesis reports a protective benefit for vitamin E and selenium against esophageal cancer, particularly if administered early after exposure to a carcinogen.
Formaldehyde, the same chemical used in embalming fluid, is a well-known carcinogen, Epstein points out.
Aristolochic were also added to the list as a known human carcinogen.
Riddelliine, which is found in some plants, also was classified as a reasonably anticipated human carcinogen.
have unacceptably high levels of this particular carcinogen," explained Hecht.
Formaldehyde, deemed a carcinogen in the latest Report, is found in many products used in homes, businesses, and schools.
How do you know when you have sufficient evidence to say a carcinogen has a threshold?
The study, conducted by the county's Environmental Toxicology Bureau, tested tap water at 110 county government facilities and found 39 percent contained the suspected carcinogen at levels 13 to 40 times higher than safe drinking water goals.
The new findings "provide the first direct evidence that a tobacco-specific carcinogen from maternal smoking passes the placenta into the human fetus--and in a considerable amount," says Lucy M.
Dose- and time-dependent changes in expression were noted in cytochrome P450 metabolism enzymes, other carcinogen metabolism genes, DNA repair genes, and cell-cycle regulation genes such as p52 and p21.