decompensation

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de·com·pen·sa·tion

 (dē′kŏm-pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. Medicine The inability of a bodily organ or system, especially the circulatory system, to maintain adequate physiological function in the presence of disease.
2. Psychology The inability to maintain defense mechanisms in response to stress, resulting in personality disturbance or psychological imbalance.

de·com′pen·sate′ v.

decompensation

(diːˌkɒmpɛnˈseɪʃən)
n
(Pathology) pathol the inability of an organ, esp the heart, to maintain its function due to overload caused by a disease

de•com•pen•sa•tion

(ˌdi kɒm pənˈseɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the inability of a diseased heart to compensate for its defect.
2. inability to maintain appropriate psychological defenses, resulting in neurotic or psychotic symptoms.
[1900–05]
de•com′pen•sate`, v.i. -sat•ed, -sat•ing.
Translations

de·com·pen·sa·tion

n. descompensación, inhabilidad del corazón para mantener una circulación adecuada.

decompensation

n (psych) descompensación f
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References in periodicals archive ?
To compensate the dysfunctional anterior wall due to MI, the left posterior wall overworked until cardiac decompensation occurs.
This is the fastest method of retrieval but is executed in very few cases because the vortex of air created by the moving blades sends the stretcher into a spin, and the resulting centrifugal force can cause cardiac decompensation in the victim.
The increased activity of the cardiac decompensation mechanism of respiratory failure patients (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and the sympathetic nervous system cause myocardial hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling, resulting in a vicious cycle.
Maternal heart disease can lead to cardiac decompensation and death, particularly in the second stage of labour.
In the presence of a left atrial myxoma, the hemodynamic changes caused by the mitral stenosis-like effect of the myxoma concomitant with the circulatory burden of pregnancy may result in cardiac decompensation and congestive heart failure and lead to the death of the mother or fetus.
Its blood pressure was 160/80 mmHg, heart rate 90/minute, without cardiac decompensation signs, without cardiac murmurs.
Her cardiac decompensation resolved over several days and an ejection fraction of 70% was noted on echocardiogram 10 weeks after her admission.
The Heart Failure Monitor has a number of settings, including a thoracic impedance feature that predicts imminent cardiac decompensation, heart failure and helps physicians to prevent hospitalization.
Having detected a murmur in the mitral valve of the patient's heart, the pulmonologist believed that the patient was most likely suffering from a mitral-valve disease that was causing cardiac decompensation.