cardiac

(redirected from cardiac valvular disease)
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Related to cardiac valvular disease: Heart valve disease

car·di·ac

 (kär′dē-ăk′)
adj.
1. Of, near, or relating to the heart: cardiac arteries. See Usage Note at coronary.
2. Of or relating to the cardia.
n.
A person with a heart disorder.

[Middle English, from Latin cardiacus, from Greek kardiakos, from kardiā, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cardiac

(ˈkɑːdɪˌæk)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of or relating to the heart
2. (Anatomy) of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
n
3. (Medicine) a person with a heart disorder
4. (Pharmacology) obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle
[C17: from Latin cardiacus, from Greek, from kardia heart]

car•di•ac

(ˈkɑr diˌæk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the heart: cardiac disease.
2. of or pertaining to the esophageal portion of the stomach.
n.
3. a person suffering from heart disease.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French cardiaque) < Latin cardiacus < Greek kardiakós <kardí(a) heart]

car·di·ac

(kär′dē-ăk′)
Relating to the heart: a cardiac disorder.

cardiac

Relating to the heart.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cardiac - of or relating to the heart; "cardiac arrest"
Translations
قَلْبي، مُتَعَلِّقٌ بالقَلب
srdeční
hjerte-
قلبی
szív-
hjarta-
širdies
sirds-
kalbe ait

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk]
A. ADJcardíaco
B. CPD cardiac arrest Nparo m cardíaco

cardiac

[ˈkɑːrdiæk] adjcardiaquecardiac arrest narrêt m cardiaque

cardiac

adjHerz-

cardiac

[ˈkɑːdɪæk] adj (Med) → cardiaco/a

cardiac

(ˈkaːdiӕk) adjective
of the heart. This patient has a cardiac complaint; cardiac failure.

car·di·ac

a. cardíaco-a, referente al corazón.

cardiac

adj cardíaco or cardiaco
References in periodicals archive ?
6] In a primary care setting it is important to have a high index of suspicion, and the clinical history of a patient with unexplained high fever should always include asking about possible risk factors such as previous cardiac valvular disease, IV drug use, the presence of prosthetic devices (prosthetic valves, orthopaedic hardware), as well as cardiac implantable electronic devices such as pacemakers, which can be possible sources of infection.
There is considerable evidence indicating that there is a direct relationship between ventricular wall stress and the extent of myocardial hypertrophy in chronic pathologic states such as hypertension and cardiac valvular disease.
Although Doppler echocardiographic examination at rest is now the preferred imaging modality for the evaluation of patients with cardiac valvular disease, the current ACC/AHA guidelines have given a class I recommendation for stress echocardiography in patients with mitral stenosis and discordance between symptoms and stenosis severity (1).