cardinal


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cardinal
female (left) and male (right) cardinals
Cardinalis cardinalis

car·di·nal

 (kär′dn-əl, kärd′nəl)
adj.
1. Of foremost importance; paramount: a cardinal rule; cardinal sins.
2. Dark to deep or vivid red.
n.
1. Abbr. Card. Roman Catholic Church A high church official, ranking just below the pope, who has been appointed by a pope to membership in the College of Cardinals.
2. A dark to deep or vivid red.
3. A North American bird (Cardinalis cardinalis) having a crested head, a short thick bill, and bright red plumage in the male.
4. A short hooded cloak, originally of scarlet cloth, worn by women in the 1700s.
5. A cardinal number.

[Middle English, from Late Latin cardinālis, principal, pivotal, from Latin, serving as a hinge, from cardō, cardin-, hinge.]

car′di·nal·ship′ n.

cardinal

(ˈkɑːdɪnəl)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church any of the members of the Sacred College, ranking next after the pope, who elect the pope and act as his chief counsellors
2. (Colours) Also called: cardinal red a deep vivid red colour
3. (Mathematics) See cardinal number
4. (Animals) Also called: cardinal grosbeak or redbird (US)a crested North American bunting, Richmondena (or Pyrrhuloxia) cardinalis, the male of which has a bright red plumage and the female a brown one
5. (Animals) a fritillary butterfly, Pandoriana pandora, found in meadows of southern Europe
6. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's hooded shoulder cape worn in the 17th and 18th centuries
adj
7. (usually prenominal) fundamentally important; principal: cardinal sin.
8. (Colours) of a deep vivid red colour
9. (Anatomy) astrology of or relating to the signs Aries, Cancer, Libra, and Capricorn. Compare mutable2, fixed10
[C13: from Latin cardinālis, literally: relating to a hinge, hence, that on which something depends, principal, from cardō hinge]
ˈcardinally adv

car•di•nal

(ˈkɑr dn l)

adj.
1. of prime importance; chief; principal.
2. of the color cardinal.
n.
3. a high ecclesiastic appointed by the pope to the College of Cardinals.
4. a common crested songbird, Cardinalis cardinalis, of North America, the male of which is bright red.
5. a deep, rich red color.
6. a woman's short scarlet cloak with a hood, worn in the 18th century.
[before 1150; < Latin cardinālis <cardō hinge]
car′di•nal•ly, adv.
car′di•nal•ship`, n.

cardinal

One of the three qualities; associated with receptivity, initiative and executive action.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardinal - (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popescardinal - (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
College of Cardinals, Sacred College - (Roman Catholic Church) the body of cardinals who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
bishop - a senior member of the Christian clergy having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve Apostles of Christ
dean - (Roman Catholic Church) the head of the College of Cardinals
2.cardinal - the number of elements in a mathematical set; denotes a quantity but not the order
number - a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"
absolute frequency, frequency - the number of observations in a given statistical category
googol - a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by 100 zeros (ten raised to the power of a hundred)
googolplex - a cardinal number represented as 1 followed by a googol of zeros (ten raised to the power of a googol)
3.cardinal - a variable color averaging a vivid redcardinal - a variable color averaging a vivid red
red, redness - red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
4.cardinal - crested thick-billed North American finch having bright red plumage in the malecardinal - crested thick-billed North American finch having bright red plumage in the male
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
Adj.1.cardinal - serving as an essential component; "a cardinal rule"; "the central cause of the problem"; "an example that was fundamental to the argument"; "computers are fundamental to modern industrial structure"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
2.cardinal - being or denoting a numerical quantity but not order; "cardinal numbers"
ordinal - being or denoting a numerical order in a series; "ordinal numbers"; "held an ordinal rank of seventh"

cardinal

adjective principal, first, highest, greatest, leading, important, chief, main, prime, central, key, essential, primary, fundamental, paramount, foremost, pre-eminent As a salesman, your cardinal rule is to do everything you can to satisfy the customer.
lowest, secondary, subordinate, least important, dispensable, inessential

cardinal

adjective
Most important, influential, or significant:
Translations
أصْليكاردينال
kardinálpodstatnýhlavní
kardinalkardinal-
kardinaaliperuslukupunakardinaali
bíboros
höfuî-, megin-kardináli
基本
kardinolaskiekiniai skaitvardžiai
galvenaiskardināls
kardinál
kardinal
en önemlikardinaltemel
lượngsố lượng

cardinal

[ˈkɑːdɪnl]
A. ADJcardinal
a cardinal ruleuna regla primordial or fundamental
of cardinal importancede capital importancia
B. N (Rel) → cardenal m
C. CPD cardinal number N (Math) → número m cardinal
cardinal point Npunto m cardinal
cardinal sin N (Rel) → pecado m capital
cardinal virtue Nvirtud f cardinal

cardinal

[ˈkɑːrdnəl]
adj [rule] → cardinal(e)
n (= cleric) → cardinal mcardinal sin npéché m capitalcard index nfichier m (alphabétique)

cardinal

n
(Eccl) → Kardinal m
adj (= chief)Haupt-; (= utmost)äußerste(r, s) attr

cardinal

:
cardinal number
nKardinalzahl f
cardinal points
cardinal red
nPurpurrot nt
cardinal sin
nTodsünde f
cardinal virtue

cardinal

[ˈkɑːdɪnl] adj & ncardinale (m)

cardinal

(ˈkaːdənl) adjective
chief; principal. cardinal sins.
noun
(the status of) one of the men next in rank to the Pope in the Roman Catholic Church.
cardinal numbers numbers expressing quantity (1,2,3 etc). See also ordinal numbers
References in classic literature ?
Prudence was never a cardinal virtue of the Kentucky boy.
You deal with me better than your word, noble knight,'' whimpered forth poor Wamba, whose habits of buffoonery were not to be overcome even by the immediate prospect of death; ``if you give me the red cap you propose, out of a simple monk you will make a cardinal.
As to the one quality in which she had always felt superior to Agatha, and which she called " good breeding," Trefusis had so far destroyed her conceit in that, that she was beginning to doubt whether it was not her cardinal defect.
Even the cardinal virtues cannot atone for half-cold entrees, as Lord Henry remarked once, in a discussion on the subject, and there is possibly a good deal to be said for his view.
He must know mathematics, for at every turn some occasion for them will present itself to him; and, putting it aside that he must be adorned with all the virtues, cardinal and theological, to come down to minor particulars, he must, I say, be able to swim as well as Nicholas or Nicolao the Fish could, as the story goes; he must know how to shoe a horse, and repair his saddle and bridle; and, to return to higher matters, he must be faithful to God and to his lady; he must be pure in thought, decorous in words, generous in works, valiant in deeds, patient in suffering, compassionate towards the needy, and, lastly, an upholder of the truth though its defence should cost him his life.
The ambitious cardinal, who was prime minister to Henry VIII.
The estate is called Carfax, no doubt a corruption of the old Quatre Face, as the house is four sided, agreeing with the cardinal points of the compass.
So that I prefer to make no chronicle for that gap of time, to tell only one cardinal incident of the ten months I spent as an intimate of these half-humanised brutes.
The citizens always took up arms readily against thieves, wolves or scoundrels, often against nobles or Huguenots, sometimes against the king, but never against cardinal or Spain.
You know," said the abbe, "that I was the secretary and intimate friend of Cardinal Spada, the last of the princes of that name.
In a splendid chamber of the Palais Royal, formerly styled the Palais Cardinal, a man was sitting in deep reverie, his head supported on his hands, leaning over a gilt and inlaid table which was covered with letters and papers.
All eyes, after having admired the young king, so handsome and so agreeable, sought for that other king of France, much otherwise king than the former, and so old, so pale, so bent, that people called him the Cardinal Mazarin.