cardoon


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Related to cardoon: globe artichoke

car·doon

 (kär-do͞on′)
n.
A Mediterranean plant (Cynara cardunculus) closely related to the artichoke, cultivated for its edible leafstalks and roots.

[Middle English cardoun, from Old French cardon, from Old Provençal, from Late Latin cardō, cardōn-, from Latin carduus, wild thistle.]

cardoon

(kɑːˈduːn)
n
(Plants) a thistle-like S European plant, Cynara cardunculus, closely related to the artichoke, with spiny leaves, purple flowers, and a leafstalk that may be blanched and eaten: family Asteraceae (composites)
[C17: from French cardon, ultimately from Latin carduus thistle, artichoke]

car•doon

(kɑrˈdun)

also car•don

(-ˈdoʊn)

n.
a composite plant, Cynara cardunculus, of the Mediterranean area, having a root and leafstalks eaten as a vegetable.
[1605–15; < Middle French cardon < Old Provençal < Medieval Latin cardōn-, s. of cardō, for Latin card(u)us thistle, cardoon]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardoon - southern European plant having spiny leaves and purple flowers cultivated for its edible leafstalks and roots
cardoon - only parts eaten are roots and especially stalks (blanched and used as celery); related to artichokes
Cynara, genus Cynara - artichoke; cardoon
vegetable - any of various herbaceous plants cultivated for an edible part such as the fruit or the root of the beet or the leaf of spinach or the seeds of bean plants or the flower buds of broccoli or cauliflower
2.cardoon - only parts eaten are roots and especially stalks (blanched and used as celery); related to artichokes
veg, vegetable, veggie - edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant
cardoon, Cynara cardunculus - southern European plant having spiny leaves and purple flowers cultivated for its edible leafstalks and roots
Translations
cardocardo borriquerocardo comestiblecardo de comercardo lechero
References in classic literature ?
Set out for Buenos Ayres -- Rio Sauce -- Sierra Ventana -- Third Posta -- Driving Horses -- Bolas -- Partridges and Foxes -- Features of the Country -- Long-legged Plover -- Teru-tero -- Hail-storm -- Natural Enclosures in the Sierra Tapalguen -- Flesh of Puma -- Meat Diet -- Guardia del Monte -- Effects of Cattle on the Vegetation -- Cardoon -- Buenos Ayres -- Corral where Cattle are Slaughtered.
But the cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) has a far wider range: [9] it occurs in these latitudes on both sides of the, Cordillera, across the continent.
474) says that the cardoon and artichoke are both found wild.
A cocktail made with equal parts Plantation aged rum, amber-style vermouth and the Italian cardoon amaro Cardamaro was a big hit at the Hawthorne recently.
Then it was off to cheesemaker Can Morey at Carretera where the milk from the red Mallorcan sheep is used to produce cheese in centuries-old fashion using the thistle-like cardoon plant to help it set.
30am yesterday in the nine-year-old Ford Fiesta which stood feet from the town house on Cardoon Road, Consett, County Durham.
Try growing thistle-like Cynara (a group which includes the cardoon and globe artichoke), which produces handsome foliage and dramatic purple thistle flower heads at the back of a border to add summer interest to shrubs, or allow them to grow through cottage garden favourites.
The cardoon looked completely dead, and I was thinking of starting again from seed, but it's coming back stronger than ever, and I've moved it as it clearly wasn't happy under the hedge.
How about mizuna, kohlrabi, kiwano, shiso, roselle, cape gooseberry, cardoon, scorzonera, spilanthes, or hyacinth bean?
This year, she is trying cardoon, from the artichoke family.
1655) in a rare appearance outside of Spain; Juan Sanchez Cotan's "Still Life with Cardoon and Parsnips" (c.