cards


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Related to cards: Business cards, Birthday cards, Ecards

card 1

 (kärd)
n.
1. A flat, usually rectangular piece of stiff paper, cardboard, or plastic, especially:
a. One of a set or pack bearing significant numbers, symbols, or figures, used in games and in divination.
b. A greeting card.
c. A postcard.
d. One bearing a person's name and other information, used for purposes of identification or classification.
e. One bearing the image and often the statistics of a sports figure.
f. A business card.
g. A credit card.
h. A magnetic card.
i. One used for recording information in a file: an index card; a recipe card.
2. cards(used with a sing. or pl. verb) Games
a. A game played with cards.
b. The playing of games with cards.
3. A program, especially for a sports event.
4.
a. A menu, as in a restaurant.
b. A wine list.
5. Computers
a. A printed circuit board that plugs into a slot on a computer's motherboard or into a port on the outside of a device, and performs a particular function, such as data storage or converting and processing signals for communication with other devices.
b. A punch card.
6. A compass card.
7. Informal An eccentrically amusing person.
8.
a. Something, such as an advantageous circumstance or tactical maneuver, that can be used to help gain an objective. Often used with play: "[He believed that] Soviet Russia ... had far more Iranian cards to play than the United States" (Theodore Draper).
b. An appeal to a specified issue or argument, usually one involving strong emotions. Often used with play: "His exposure as a racist ... allowed the defense to play the race card" (New York Times).
tr.v. card·ed, card·ing, cards
1. To furnish with or attach to a card.
2. To list (something) on a card; catalog.
3. To check the identification of, especially in order to verify legal age.
4. Sports To warn or eject (a soccer player who has committed a flagrant foul) by showing a yellow card or a red card.
Phrasal Verbs:
card in
To sign in, as at a place of business, by use of a magnetic card.
card out
To sign out, as from a place of business, by use of a magnetic card.
Idioms:
card up (one's) sleeve
A secret resource or plan held in reserve: a tough negotiator who had a number of cards up his sleeve.
in the cards
Likely or certain to happen: My promotion to a higher position just isn't in the cards.
put/lay (one's) cards on the table
To make frank and clear revelation, as of one's motives or intentions.

[Middle English carde, from Old French carte, from Latin charta, paper made from papyrus, from Greek khartēs.]

card 2

 (kärd)
n.
1. A wire-toothed brush or a machine fitted with rows of wire teeth, used to straighten and separate fibers, as of wool, prior to spinning.
2. A device used to raise the nap on a fabric.
tr.v. card·ed, card·ing, cards
To comb out or brush with a card.

[Middle English carde, from Medieval Latin cardus, from Latin carduus, thistle.]

card′er n.

cards

(kɑːdz)
n
1. (Card Games) (usually functioning as singular)
a. any game or games played with cards, esp playing cards
b. the playing of such a game
2. an employee's national insurance and other documents held by the employer
3. get one's cards to be told to leave one's employment
4. on the cards possible or likely. US equivalent: in the cards
5. play one's cards to carry out one's plans; take action (esp in the phrase play one's cards right)
6. put one's cards on the table lay one's cards on the table show one's cards to declare one's intentions, resources, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cards - a game played with playing cardscards - a game played with playing cards  
discard - (cards) the act of throwing out a useless card or of failing to follow suit
shuffle, shuffling, make - the act of mixing cards haphazardly
reshuffling, reshuffle - shuffling again; "the gambler demanded a reshuffle"
game - a contest with rules to determine a winner; "you need four people to play this game"
cutting, cut - the division of a deck of cards before dealing; "he insisted that we give him the last cut before every deal"; "the cutting of the cards soon became a ritual"
all fours, high-low-jack - card games in which points are won for taking the high or low or jack or game
baccarat, chemin de fer - a card game played in casinos in which two or more punters gamble against the banker; the player wins who holds 2 or 3 cards that total closest to nine
beggar-my-neighbor, beggar-my-neighbour, strip-Jack-naked - a card game for two players in which the object is to win all of the other player's cards
vingt-et-un, twenty-one, blackjack - a gambling game using cards; the object is to hold cards having a higher count than those dealt to the banker up to but not exceeding 21
bridge - any of various card games based on whist for four players
cassino, casino - a card game in which cards face up on the table are taken with eligible cards in the hand
cribbage, crib - a card game (usually for two players) in which each player is dealt six cards and discards one or two
ecarte - a card game for 2 players; played with 32 cards and king high
euchre, five hundred - a card game similar to ecarte; each player is dealt 5 cards and the player making trump must take 3 tricks to win a hand
sevens, fantan, parliament - a card game in which you play your sevens and other cards in sequence in the same suit as the sevens; you win if you are the first to use all your cards
faro - a card game in which players bet against the dealer on the cards he will draw from a dealing box
Go Fish - a card game for two players who try to assemble books of cards by asking the opponent for particular cards
four-card monte, monte, three-card monte - a gambling card game of Spanish origin; 3 or 4 cards are dealt face up and players bet that one of them will be matched before the others as the cards are dealt from the pack one at a time
stops, Newmarket, boodle, Chicago, Michigan - a gambling card game in which chips are placed on the ace and king and queen and jack of separate suits (taken from a separate deck); a player plays the lowest card of a suit in his hand and successively higher cards are played until the sequence stops; the player who plays a card matching one in the layout wins all the chips on that card
Napoleon, nap - a card game similar to whist; usually played for stakes
old maid - a card game using a pack of cards from which one queen has been removed; players match cards and the player holding the unmatched queen at the end of the game is the loser (or `old maid')
bezique, penuchle, pinochle, pinocle - a card game played with a pack of forty-eight cards (two of each suit for high cards); play resembles whist
piquet - a card game for two players using a reduced pack of 32 cards
pisha paysha - (Yiddish) a card game for two players one of whom is usually a child; the deck is place face down with one card face upward; players draw from the deck alternately hoping to build up or down from the open card; the player with the fewest cards when the deck is exhausted is the winner
poker game, poker - any of various card games in which players bet that they hold the highest-ranking hand
rouge et noir, trente-et-quarante - a card game in which two rows of cards are dealt and players can bet on the color of the cards or on which row will have a count nearer some number
rum, rummy - a card game based on collecting sets and sequences; the winner is the first to meld all their cards
patience, solitaire - a card game played by one person
long whist, short whist, whist - a card game for four players who form two partnerships; a pack of 52 cards is dealt and each side scores one point for each trick it takes in excess of six
doubling, double - raising the stakes in a card game by a factor of 2; "I decided his double was a bluff"
deal - the act of distributing playing cards; "the deal was passed around the table clockwise"
lead - the playing of a card to start a trick in bridge; "the lead was in the dummy"
renege, revoke - the mistake of not following suit when able to do so
trumping, ruff - (card games) the act of taking a trick with a trump when unable to follow suit
trick - (card games) in a single round, the sequence of cards played by all the players; the high card is the winner
shoe - (card games) a case from which playing cards are dealt one at a time
Translations
hra v karty
kortspil
spil
hra s kartami
kâğıt oyunu

card

(kaːd) noun
1. thick paper or thin board. shapes cut out from card.
2. (also ˈplaying card) a small piece of such paper etc with designs, used in playing certain games. a pack of cards.
3. a similar object used for eg sending greetings, showing membership of an organization, storing information etc. a birthday card; a membership card; a business card.
cards noun singular
the game(s) played with playing-cards. He cheats at cards.
ˈcardboard noun, adjective
(of) a stiff kind of paper often made up of several layers. a cardboard box.
References in classic literature ?
Jo remembered the kind old gentleman, who used to let her build railroads and bridges with his big dictionaries, tell her stories about queer pictures in his Latin books, and buy her cards of gingerbread whenever he met her in the street.
Here and there he went throwing the money about, driving carriages through the streets, giving wine parties to crowds of men and women, playing cards for high stakes and keeping mistresses whose wardrobes cost him hundreds of dollars.
On the white pages I grouped Sunday-School cards and advertising cards which I had brought from my `old country.
A light-colored mulatto boy, in dress coat and bearing a diminutive silver tray for the reception of cards, admitted them.
Well, well; I heard Ahab mutter, "Here some one thrusts these cards into these old hands of mine; swears that I must play them, and no others.
Before another month was by, all the working members of his family had union cards, and wore their union buttons conspicuously and with pride.
This religious talk on such matters,--why don't they carry it a little further, and show the beauty, in its season, of a fellow's taking a glass too much, and sitting a little too late over his cards, and various providential arrangements of that sort, which are pretty frequent among us young men;--we'd like to hear that those are right and godly, too.
Some of them were sipping wine, others were playing cards, others chess, other groups were chatting together, and many were smoking cigarettes while they waited for the coming duels.
There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest kind of words and pictures made with charcoal.
But sometimes of an evening, before we went to cards, he would read something aloud out of the Elegant Extracts, very entertaining.
If their evenings at the park were concluded with cards, he cheated himself and all the rest of the party to get her a good hand.
The dowagers Ingram and Lynn sought solace in a quiet game at cards.