care for


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.care for - have a liking, fondness, or taste (for)
like - find enjoyable or agreeable; "I like jogging"; "She likes to read Russian novels"
2.care for - be fond ofcare for - be fond of; be attached to    
love - have a great affection or liking for; "I love French food"; "She loves her boss and works hard for him"
yearn - have affection for; feel tenderness for
3.care for - provide treatment forcare for - provide treatment for; "The doctor treated my broken leg"; "The nurses cared for the bomb victims"; "The patient must be treated right away or she will die"; "Treat the infection with antibiotics"
hyperventilate - produce hyperventilation in; "The nurses had to hyperventilate the patient"
massage - give a massage to; "She massaged his sore back"
purge - excrete or evacuate (someone's bowels or body); "The doctor decided that the patient must be purged"
correct - treat a defect; "The new contact lenses will correct for his myopia"
insufflate - treat by blowing a powder or vapor into a bodily cavity
detox, detoxify - treat for alcohol or drug dependence; "He was detoxified in the clinic"
irrigate - supply with a constant flow or sprinkling of some liquid, for the purpose of cooling, cleansing, or disinfecting; "irrigate the wound"
iodise, iodize - treat with iodine so as to prevent infection; "iodize a wound"
doctor - give medical treatment to
vet - provide (a person) with medical care
nurse - try to cure by special care of treatment, of an illness or injury; "He nursed his cold with Chinese herbs"
manipulate - treat manually, as with massage, for therapeutic purposed
dispense, administer - give or apply (medications)
remedy, relieve - provide relief for; "remedy his illness"
dress - apply a bandage or medication to; "dress the victim's wounds"
splint - support with a splint; "splint a broken finger"
operate on, operate - perform surgery on; "The doctors operated on the patient but failed to save his life"
medicine, medicate - treat medicinally, treat with medicine
leech, phlebotomise, phlebotomize, bleed - draw blood; "In the old days, doctors routinely bled patients as part of the treatment"
cup, transfuse - treat by applying evacuated cups to the patient's skin
shock - subject to electrical shocks
pack - treat the body or any part of it by wrapping it, as with blankets or sheets, and applying compresses to it, or stuffing it to provide cover, containment, or therapy, or to absorb blood; "The nurse packed gauze in the wound"; "You had better pack your swollen ankle with ice"
cauterise, cauterize, burn - burn, sear, or freeze (tissue) using a hot iron or electric current or a caustic agent; "The surgeon cauterized the wart"
psychoanalyse, psychoanalyze, analyse, analyze - subject to psychoanalytic treatment; "I was analyzed in Vienna by a famous psychiatrist"

care

noun
2. A cause of distress or anxiety:
3. Careful forethought to avoid harm or risk:
6. The function of watching, guarding, or overseeing:
7. The systematic application of remedies to effect a cure:
Informal: rehab.
verb
To have an objection:
phrasal verb
care for
To have the care and supervision of:
Idioms: keep an eye on, look out for, take care of, take under one's wing.
Translations
يُحِبُّ، يَرْغَبُيَعْتَني بِ ، يَهْتَمُّ بِ
mít rádstarat se o
holde afpassepleje
annast, sjá umòykja vænt um

care

(keə) noun
1. close attention. Do it with care.
2. keeping; protection. Your belongings will be safe in my care.
3. (a cause for) worry. free from care; all the cares of the world.
4. treatment. medical care; skin care.
verb
1. to be anxious or concerned. Don't you care if you fail?; I couldn't care less (= It's of no importance to me); She really cares about her career.
2. to be willing (to). Would you care to have dinner with me?
ˈcareful adjective
1. taking care; being cautious. Be careful when you cross the street; a careful driver.
2. thorough. a careful search.
ˈcarefully adverb
ˈcarefulness noun
ˈcareless adjective
not careful (enough). This work is careless; a careless worker.
ˈcarelessly adverb
ˈcarelessness noun
ˈcarefree adjective
light-hearted. a carefree attitude.
care'giver noun
someone whose job is to look after a sick or disabled person.
ˈcaretaker noun
a person who looks after a building etc.
ˈcareworn adjective
worn out by worry. a careworn face.
ˈcare for
1. to look after (someone). The nurse will care for you.
2. to be fond of. I don't care for him enough to marry him.
care of (usually written c/o)
at the house or address of.
take care
to be cautious, watchful, thorough etc. Take care or you will fall!
take care of
to look after. Their aunt took care of them when their parents died.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, health care organizations suffer a double hit because they are squeezed between providing health care for employees and stingy third-party payment formulas.
Because there are no restrictions on how the cash is used, it can be used to help pay for care for a spouse, family member or friend.
That includes estimating how many will be eligible for nursing home care based on law and VA policy, and to what extent veterans will need short-stay care after an acute medical incident or extended care for chronic needs.
Pushed by large employers who are eager to know what they are buying when they purchase health care for their employees, an outfit called the National Committee for Quality Assurance today ranks health-care plans on 17 different performance measures.
The steps outlined below should help accomplish the goal of limiting the rate of increase of health care costs while ensuring better quality care for all Americans.
Of course, managed care for nursing homes raises some special issues.
More than one quarter of the adult population has provided care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged family member or friend during the past year.
The first system is composed of three subsystems of general care (SS/INSALUD, provincial councils, and psychiatric hospitals and municipal care for the poor and indigent).
In a recent health services research study performed at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (CSMC), we developed guidelines to improve the quality and efficiency of medical care for patients hospitalized with chest pain.
She feels nursing homes will not be adversely affected by this shift: "We're not looking at a major substitution of home care for nursing home care -- in fact, we have not built that into our estimates at all.
Through the leadership and expertise of these physicians, hospices can aspire to a new level of excellence - both in terms of how we care for our patients and families and in how we identify and reach out to those in need.
However, with ever-increasing growth in technology and subspecialization, the appropriateness of the primary care physician to care for the hospitalize patient is in question.