cargo


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car·go

 (kär′gō)
n. pl. car·goes or car·gos
Freight carried by a ship, an aircraft, or another vehicle.

[Spanish, from cargar, to load, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, a Gallic type of wagon; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

cargo

(ˈkɑːɡəʊ)
n, pl -goes or -gos
1.
a. goods carried by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle; freight
b. (as modifier): a cargo vessel.
2. any load: the train pulled in with its cargo of new arrivals.
[C17: from Spanish: from cargar to load, from Late Latin carricāre to load a vehicle, from carrus car]

car•go

(ˈkɑr goʊ)

n., pl. -goes, -gos.
1. the load of goods carried by a ship, airplane, etc.; freight.
2. cargos, pants or shorts having several pleated and flapped pockets to hold bulky gear and small items.
adj.
3. of or being a style of pants or shorts with pleated pockets.
[1640–50; < Sp: a load, n. derivative of cargar to load < Late Latin carricāre; see charge]

cargo

Commodities and supplies in transit. See also air cargo; dangerous cargo; essential cargo; immediately vital cargo; unwanted cargo; valuable cargo; wanted cargo. See also loading; chemical ammunition cargo; flatted cargo; general cargo; heavy-lift cargo; high explosive cargo; inflammable cargo; perishable cargo; special cargo; troop space cargo; vehicle cargo.

Cargo

 a shipload, 1657; a load. See also burden.
Examples: cargo of brown sugar, 1705; of ginger, 1705; of lampoons, 1762; of novels, 1806.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cargo - goods carried by a large vehiclecargo - goods carried by a large vehicle  
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"

cargo

noun load, goods, contents, shipment, freight, merchandise, baggage, ware, consignment, tonnage, lading The boat calls at the main port to load its cargo of bananas.

cargo

noun
Something carried physically:
Sports: impost.
Translations
حُمُولةحُمولَه، شَحْنَه
náklad
lastladning
lasti
teret
farmur
貨物
화물
krovinys
krava
tovor
last
สินค้า
hàng hóa

cargo

[ˈkɑːgəʊ]
A. N (cargoes or (esp US) cargos (pl)) → cargamento m, carga f
B. CPD cargo boat Nbuque m de carga, carguero m
cargo plane Navión m de carga

cargo

[ˈkɑːrgəʊ] [cargoes] (pl) ncargaison f, chargement mcargo boat ncargo mcargo plane navion-cargo mcargo ship ncargo mcar hire n (British) (= business) → location f de voitures; [of one car] → location f de voiture

cargo

n(Schiffs)fracht or -ladung f, → Kargo m (spec); cargo boatFrachter m, → Frachtdampfer m, → Frachtschiff nt

cargo

[ˈkɑːgəʊ] ncarico

cargo

(ˈkaːgəu) plural ˈcargoes noun
a load of goods carried by a ship etc. a cargo of cotton.

cargo

حُمُولة náklad last Fracht φορτίο cargamento lasti cargaison teret carico 貨物 화물 vracht last ładunek carga груз last สินค้า kargo hàng hóa 货物
References in classic literature ?
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
While other hulls are loaded down with alien stuff, to be transferred to foreign wharves; the world-wandering whale-ship carries no cargo but herself and crew, their weapons and their wants.
WELL, when that cargo arrived toward sunset, Sat- urday afternoon, I had my hands full to keep the Marcos from fainting.
He accepts, and the pleasant talk and the beer flow for an hour or two, and by and by the professor, properly charged and comfortable, gives a cordial good night, while the students stand bowing and uncovered; and then he moves on his happy way homeward with all his vast cargo of learning afloat in his hold.
He disappeared, and presently returned with the wagon, put the two small sacks into it, threw some old rags on top of them, and started off, dragging his cargo behind him.
I could not proceed to the schoolroom without passing some of their doors, and running the risk of being surprised with my cargo of victualage; so I stood still at this end, which, being windowless, was dark: quite dark now, for the sun was set and twilight gathering.
I am often inclined to wonder whether the British sailor is at all aware, when he has got his cargo on board, of the Hydrostatic importance of the operation that he has performed.
On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by, their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had learned it perfectly.
I then took off my spectacles, and waiting about an hour, till the tide was a little fallen, I waded through the middle with my cargo, and arrived safe at the royal port of Lilliput.
One day after my return, as I went down to the quay, I saw a ship which had just cast anchor, and was discharging her cargo, while the merchants to whom it belonged were busily directing the removal of it to their warehouses.
It would not be easy to determine whether our arrival gave us greater joy, or the inhabitants greater apprehensions, for we could discern a continual tumult in the land, and took notice that the crews of some barks that lay in the harbour were unlading with all possible diligence, to prevent the cargo from falling into our hands, very much indeed to the dissatisfaction of many of our soldiers, who having engaged in this expedition, with no other view than of filling their pockets, were, before the return of our Abyssin, for treating them like enemies, and taking them as a lawful prize.
To the companies that sell perishable commodities, an instantaneous conversation with a buyer in a distant city has often saved a carload or a cargo.