cargo

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Related to cargoes: general cargo, freight

car·go

 (kär′gō)
n. pl. car·goes or car·gos
Freight carried by a ship, an aircraft, or another vehicle.

[Spanish, from cargar, to load, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, a Gallic type of wagon; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

cargo

(ˈkɑːɡəʊ)
n, pl -goes or -gos
1.
a. goods carried by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle; freight
b. (as modifier): a cargo vessel.
2. any load: the train pulled in with its cargo of new arrivals.
[C17: from Spanish: from cargar to load, from Late Latin carricāre to load a vehicle, from carrus car]

car•go

(ˈkɑr goʊ)

n., pl. -goes, -gos.
1. the load of goods carried by a ship, airplane, etc.; freight.
2. cargos, pants or shorts having several pleated and flapped pockets to hold bulky gear and small items.
adj.
3. of or being a style of pants or shorts with pleated pockets.
[1640–50; < Sp: a load, n. derivative of cargar to load < Late Latin carricāre; see charge]

cargo

Commodities and supplies in transit. See also air cargo; dangerous cargo; essential cargo; immediately vital cargo; unwanted cargo; valuable cargo; wanted cargo. See also loading; chemical ammunition cargo; flatted cargo; general cargo; heavy-lift cargo; high explosive cargo; inflammable cargo; perishable cargo; special cargo; troop space cargo; vehicle cargo.

Cargo

 a shipload, 1657; a load. See also burden.
Examples: cargo of brown sugar, 1705; of ginger, 1705; of lampoons, 1762; of novels, 1806.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cargo - goods carried by a large vehiclecargo - goods carried by a large vehicle  
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"

cargo

noun load, goods, contents, shipment, freight, merchandise, baggage, ware, consignment, tonnage, lading The boat calls at the main port to load its cargo of bananas.

cargo

noun
Something carried physically:
Sports: impost.
Translations
حُمُولةحُمولَه، شَحْنَه
náklad
lastladning
lasti
teret
farmur
貨物
화물
krovinys
krava
tovor
last
สินค้า
hàng hóa

cargo

[ˈkɑːgəʊ]
A. N (cargoes or (esp US) cargos (pl)) → cargamento m, carga f
B. CPD cargo boat Nbuque m de carga, carguero m
cargo plane Navión m de carga

cargo

[ˈkɑːrgəʊ] [cargoes] (pl) ncargaison f, chargement mcargo boat ncargo mcargo plane navion-cargo mcargo ship ncargo mcar hire n (British) (= business) → location f de voitures; [of one car] → location f de voiture

cargo

n(Schiffs)fracht or -ladung f, → Kargo m (spec); cargo boatFrachter m, → Frachtdampfer m, → Frachtschiff nt

cargo

[ˈkɑːgəʊ] ncarico

cargo

(ˈkaːgəu) plural ˈcargoes noun
a load of goods carried by a ship etc. a cargo of cotton.

cargo

حُمُولة náklad last Fracht φορτίο cargamento lasti cargaison teret carico 貨物 화물 vracht last ładunek carga груз last สินค้า kargo hàng hóa 货物
References in classic literature ?
This is a town of about three thousand inhabitants, with an excellent harbor and a big pier along which vessels can tie up and discharge their cargoes directly into waiting cars.
Unlike the Danes, these Orientals do not demand the obsequious homage of lowered top-sails from the endless procession of ships before the wind, which for centuries past, by night and by day, have passed between the islands of Sumatra and Java, freighted with the costliest cargoes of the east.
He used to go on the highway and rob rich wayfarers; and other times he would swoop down from his high castle on the hills of the Neckar and capture passing cargoes of merchandise.
Vessels arriving directly from foreign countries, laden with valuable cargoes, would rarely choose to hazard themselves to the complicated and critical perils which would attend attempts to unlade prior to their coming into port.
Twenty palm-thatched, beehive huts sheltered its black population, while a half-dozen goat skin tents in the center of the clearing housed the score of Arabs who found shelter here while, by trading and raiding, they collected the cargoes which their ships of the desert bore northward twice each year to the market of Timbuktu.
I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about in ships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but of their outward freights and homeward cargoes.