caricature


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car·i·ca·ture

 (kăr′ĭ-kə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1.
a. A representation, especially pictorial or literary, in which the subject's distinctive features or peculiarities are deliberately exaggerated to produce a comic or grotesque effect.
b. The art of creating such representations.
2. A grotesque imitation or misrepresentation: The trial was a caricature of justice.
tr.v. car·i·ca·tured, car·i·ca·tur·ing, car·i·ca·tures
To represent or imitate in an exaggerated, distorted manner.

[French, from Italian caricatura, from caricare, to load, exaggerate, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, a Gallic type of wagon; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

car′i·ca·tur′ist n.

caricature

(ˈkærɪkəˌtjʊə)
n
1. a pictorial, written, or acted representation of a person, which exaggerates his or her characteristic traits for comic effect
2. a ludicrously inadequate or inaccurate imitation: he is a caricature of a statesman.
vb
(tr) to represent in caricature or produce a caricature of
[C18: from Italian caricatura a distortion, exaggeration, from caricare to load, exaggerate; see cargo]
ˈcaricaˌtural adj
ˈcaricaˌturist n

car•i•ca•ture

(ˈkær ɪ kə tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. a picture or description ludicrously exaggerating the peculiarities or defects of a person or thing.
2. the art or process of producing such pictures or descriptions.
3. any imitation so distorted or inferior as to be ludicrous.
v.t.
4. to make a caricature of.
[1740–50; < Italian caricatura, derivative of caricat(o) affected, literally, loaded]
car′i•ca•tur•ist, n.
syn: See burlesque.

caricature

a distorted representation, usually pictorial, often used to parody people in public life. — caricaturist, n.
See also: Representation

caricature


Past participle: caricatured
Gerund: caricaturing

Imperative
caricature
caricature
Present
I caricature
you caricature
he/she/it caricatures
we caricature
you caricature
they caricature
Preterite
I caricatured
you caricatured
he/she/it caricatured
we caricatured
you caricatured
they caricatured
Present Continuous
I am caricaturing
you are caricaturing
he/she/it is caricaturing
we are caricaturing
you are caricaturing
they are caricaturing
Present Perfect
I have caricatured
you have caricatured
he/she/it has caricatured
we have caricatured
you have caricatured
they have caricatured
Past Continuous
I was caricaturing
you were caricaturing
he/she/it was caricaturing
we were caricaturing
you were caricaturing
they were caricaturing
Past Perfect
I had caricatured
you had caricatured
he/she/it had caricatured
we had caricatured
you had caricatured
they had caricatured
Future
I will caricature
you will caricature
he/she/it will caricature
we will caricature
you will caricature
they will caricature
Future Perfect
I will have caricatured
you will have caricatured
he/she/it will have caricatured
we will have caricatured
you will have caricatured
they will have caricatured
Future Continuous
I will be caricaturing
you will be caricaturing
he/she/it will be caricaturing
we will be caricaturing
you will be caricaturing
they will be caricaturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been caricaturing
you have been caricaturing
he/she/it has been caricaturing
we have been caricaturing
you have been caricaturing
they have been caricaturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been caricaturing
you will have been caricaturing
he/she/it will have been caricaturing
we will have been caricaturing
you will have been caricaturing
they will have been caricaturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been caricaturing
you had been caricaturing
he/she/it had been caricaturing
we had been caricaturing
you had been caricaturing
they had been caricaturing
Conditional
I would caricature
you would caricature
he/she/it would caricature
we would caricature
you would caricature
they would caricature
Past Conditional
I would have caricatured
you would have caricatured
he/she/it would have caricatured
we would have caricatured
you would have caricatured
they would have caricatured

caricature

A picture ludicrously exaggerating the qualities, defects, or peculiarities of a person or idea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caricature - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effectcaricature - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
mock-heroic - a satirical imitation of heroic verse
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
parody, pasquinade, put-on, sendup, spoof, charade, lampoon, mockery, burlesque, travesty, takeoff - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
Verb1.caricature - represent in or produce a caricature of; "The drawing caricatured the President"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"

caricature

noun
1. parody, cartoon, distortion, satire, send-up (Brit. informal), travesty, takeoff (informal), lampoon, burlesque, mimicry, farce The poster showed a caricature of Hitler with a devil's horns and tail.
verb
1. parody, take off (informal), mock, distort, ridicule, mimic, send up (Brit. informal), lampoon, burlesque, satirize Her political career has been caricatured in the newspapers.

caricature

noun
A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations
رَسْمٌ هَزَليُّ ساخِرٌ
karikaturakarikovat
karikatur
karikatyyripilakuva
karikatúra
skopmynd
karikatūrakarikatūristas
karikatūra
karykaturakarykaturować

caricature

[ˈkærɪkətjʊəʳ]
A. Ncaricatura f; (in newspaper) → dibujo m cómico
it was a caricature of a ceremony (fig) → fue una parodia de ceremonia
B. VTcaricaturizar

caricature

[ˈkærɪkətʃʊər] n
(= drawing) → caricature f
(= exaggeration) [truth] → caricature f

caricature

nKarikatur f
vtkarikieren

caricature

[ˈkærɪkəˌtjʊəʳ]
1. ncaricatura
2. vtfare una caricatura di

caricature

(ˈkӕrikətjuə) noun
a drawing or imitation (of someone or something) which is so exaggerated as to appear ridiculous. Caricatures of politicians appear in the newspapers every day.
ˈcaricaturist noun
a person who makes caricatures.
References in classic literature ?
Tom partly uncovered a dismal caricature of a house with two gable ends to it and a corkscrew of smoke issuing from the chimney.
I conclude these remarks by copying the following portrait of the religion of the south, (which is, by communion and fellowship, the religion of the north,) which I soberly affirm is "true to the life," and without caricature or the slightest exaggeration.
John Dashwood was a strong caricature of himself;-- more narrow-minded and selfish.
At the top of an extra page (quite a treasure, probably, when first lighted on) I was greatly amused to behold an excellent caricature of my friend Joseph, - rudely, yet powerfully sketched.
If he struggles to take a different view of the same class of subjects, he speedily discovers that what is obvious, graceful, and natural, has been exhausted; and, in order to obtain the indispensable charm of novelty, he is forced upon caricature, and, to avoid being trite, must become extravagant.
And then, as the idea came home to him, he resorted to caricature.
His prophecy, I remember, appeared in November or December, 1893, in a long-defunct publica- tion, the PALL MALL BUDGET, and I recall a caricature of it in a pre-Martian periodical called PUNCH.
Andrea Cavalcanti found his tilbury waiting at the door; the groom, in every respect a caricature of the English fashion, was standing on tiptoe to hold a large iron-gray horse.
The cap, the nose and chin, and the broad waist, form an admirable caricature, which dances, moreover, with the up-flickering and down-sinking blaze, almost too merrily for the shade of an elderly widow.
As they observed the various and contrasted figures that made up the assemblage, each man looking like a caricature of himself, in the unsteady light that flickered over him, they came mutually to the conclusion, that an odder society had never met, in city or wilderness, on mountain or plain.
Perhaps it's a dialogue between a couple of farmers--unnatural in their overdone caricature of farmers' dress more unnatural in their constrained attitudes and gestures--most unnatural in their attempts at ease and geniality in their talk.
It is, in fact, a caricature of the boasted romance of feudal times; chivalry in its native and uncultured state, and knight-errantry run wild.