carnage


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car·nage

 (kär′nĭj)
n.
1.
a. Large-scale killing or maiming, as in war or an accident.
b. A number of violently killed or maimed bodies.
2. Informal Overwhelming defeat, loss, or destruction.

[French, from Old French, from Old Italian carnaggio, from Medieval Latin carnāticum, meat, from Latin carō, carn-, flesh; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

carnage

(ˈkɑːnɪdʒ)
n
extensive slaughter, esp of human beings in battle
[C16: from French, from Italian carnaggio, from Medieval Latin carnāticum, from Latin carō flesh]

car•nage

(ˈkɑr nɪdʒ)

n.
1. the slaughter of a great number of people.
2. Archaic. dead bodies, as of those slain in battle.
[1590–1600; < Middle French < Italian carnaggio < Medieval Latin carnāticum payment or offering in meat]

Carnage

 a heap of dead bodies; men slain in a battle, 1667; carcasses collectively.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carnage - the savage and excessive killing of many peoplecarnage - the savage and excessive killing of many people
murder, slaying, execution - unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
bloodbath, bloodletting, bloodshed, battue - indiscriminate slaughter; "a bloodbath took place when the leaders of the plot surrendered"; "ten days after the bloodletting Hitler gave the action its name"; "the valley is no stranger to bloodshed and murder"; "a huge prison battue was ordered"

carnage

noun slaughter, murder, massacre, holocaust, havoc, bloodshed, shambles, mass murder, butchery, blood bath Their peaceful protest ended in carnage.

carnage

noun
The savage killing of many victims:
Translations
مَذْبَحَه، مَجْزَرَه
krveprolitímasakr
blodbadmyrderi
verilöyly
fjöldamorî, blóîbaî
žudynės
masu slepkavība

carnage

[ˈkɑːnɪdʒ] Nmatanza f, carnicería f

carnage

[ˈkɑːrnɪdʒ] n (= slaughter) → carnage m

carnage

nBlutbad nt, → Gemetzel nt; a scene of carnageein blutiges Schauspiel; fields covered with the carnage of warmit Toten or Leichen übersäte Schlachtfelder pl

carnage

[ˈkɑːnɪdʒ] ncarneficina

carnage

(ˈkaːnidʒ) noun
the slaughter of great numbers of people. the carnage of war.
References in classic literature ?
In every gallery in Europe there are hideous pictures of blood, carnage, oozing brains, putrefaction--pictures portraying intolerable suffering--pictures alive with every conceivable horror, wrought out in dreadful detail--and similar pictures are being put on the canvas every day and publicly exhibited--without a growl from anybody--for they are innocent, they are inoffensive, being works of art.
Lorry, the Doctor communicated under an injunction of secrecy on which he had no need to dwell, that the crowd had taken him through a scene of carnage to the prison of La Force.
Goe whither Fate and inclination strong Leads thee, I shall not lag behinde, nor erre The way, thou leading, such a sent I draw Of carnage, prey innumerable, and taste The savour of Death from all things there that live: Nor shall I to the work thou enterprisest Be wanting, but afford thee equal aid.
Sparta was little better than a wellregulated camp; and Rome was never sated of carnage and conquest.
Infuriated by political animosity, the wives in many a noble household wearied their lords with prayers to give up their opposition to the Colour Bill; and some, finding their entreaties fruitless, fell on and slaughtered their innocent children and husband, perishing themselves in the act of carnage.
The plain before the city became a veritable shambles ere the last Zodangan surrendered, but finally the carnage ceased, the prisoners were marched back to Helium, and we entered the greater city's gates, a huge triumphal procession of conquering heroes.
let us put our swords into our left hands and shake hands with the right, even in the very lust and music of the hottest carnage.
A frightful carnage, rather than a regular battle, succeeded.
Jove drew Hector away from the darts and dust, with the carnage and din of battle; but the son of Atreus sped onwards, calling out lustily to the Danaans.
Well, we have happily frightened the birds from this side of the valley,” said Marmaduke, “and the carnage must of necessity end for the present.
As to the seven who had been sent aloft to make sail, they contemplated with horror the carnage that was going on below.
From the pools of blood and the enormous lumps of flesh scattered in every direction over the green sward we imagined at first that a number of animals had been killed, but on examining the remains more closely we discovered that all this carnage came from one of these unwieldy monsters, which had been literally torn to pieces by some creature not larger, perhaps, but far more ferocious, than itself.