carnation


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Related to carnation: Dianthus caryophyllus

car·na·tion

 (kär-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Any of numerous cultivated forms of a perennial plant (Dianthus caryophyllus) having showy, variously colored, usually double, often fragrant flowers with fringed petals.
b. A flower of this plant. Also called clove pink.
2. A pinkish tint once used in painting.

[From obsolete French, flesh-colored, from Old French (from Old Italian carnagione, skin, complexion, from carne, flesh) or from Late Latin carnātiō, carnātiōn-, flesh, both from Latin carō, carn-; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

carnation

(kɑːˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: clove pink a Eurasian caryophyllaceous plant, Dianthus caryophyllus, cultivated in many varieties for its white, pink, or red flowers, which have a fragrant scent of cloves
2. (Plants) the flower of this plant
3. (Colours)
a. a pink or reddish-pink colour
b. (as adjective): a carnation dress.
4. (Art Terms) (often plural) a flesh tint in painting
[C16: from French: flesh colour, from Late Latin carnātiō fleshiness, from Latin carō flesh]

car•na•tion

(kɑrˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
1. any of numerous cultivated varieties of the clove pink, Dianthus caryophyllus, having long-stalked fragrant usu. double flowers in many colors.
2. pink; light red.
3. Obs. the color of flesh.
[1525–35; < Late Latin carnātiō corpulence < Latin carn- flesh]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carnation - Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowerscarnation - Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowers; widely cultivated in many varieties and many colors
garden pink, pink - any of various flowers of plants of the genus Dianthus cultivated for their fragrant flowers
2.carnation - a pink or reddish-pink color
pink - a light shade of red
Adj.1.carnation - pink or pinkish
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Translations
karafiát
nellike
neilikka
karanfil
カーネーション
카네이션
nejlika
ดอกคาร์เนชั่น
cây cẩm chướng

carnation

[kɑːˈneɪʃən] Nclavel m

carnation

[kɑːrˈneɪʃən] nœillet m

carnation

nNelke f

carnation

[kɑːˈneɪʃn] ngarofano

carnation

قَرَنْفُل karafiát nellike Nelke γαρύφαλλο clavel neilikka œillet karanfil garofano カーネーション 카네이션 anjer nellik goździk cravo гвоздика nejlika ดอกคาร์เนชั่น karanfil cây cẩm chướng 康乃馨
References in classic literature ?
But roses only bloom in summer; whereas the fine carnation of their cheeks is perennial as sunlight in the seventh heavens.
In Bowre and Field he sought, where any tuft Of Grove or Garden-Plot more pleasant lay, Thir tendance or Plantation for delight, By Fountain or by shadie Rivulet He sought them both, but wish'd his hap might find EVE separate, he wish'd, but not with hope Of what so seldom chanc'd, when to his wish, Beyond his hope, EVE separate he spies, Veild in a Cloud of Fragrance, where she stood, Half spi'd, so thick the Roses bushing round About her glowd, oft stooping to support Each Flour of slender stalk, whose head though gay Carnation, Purple, Azure, or spect with Gold, Hung drooping unsustaind, them she upstaies Gently with Mirtle band, mindless the while, Her self, though fairest unsupported Flour, From her best prop so farr, and storn so nigh.
Her glance quailed not, her cheek blanched not, for the fear of a fate so instant and so horrible; on the contrary, the thought that she had her fate at her command, and could escape at will from infamy to death, gave a yet deeper colour of carnation to her complexion, and a yet more brilliant fire to her eye.
It hovered as on wings; pearly, fleecy, gleaming air streamed like raiment round it; light, tinted with carnation, coloured what seemed face and limbs; A large star shone with still lustre on an angel's forehead; an upraised arm and hand, glancing like a ray, pointed to the bow overhead, and a voice in my heart whispered--
Sometimes they wore necklaces of small carnation flowers, strung like rubies upon a fibre of tappa, or displayed in their ears a single white bud, the stem thrust backward through the aperture, and showing in front the delicate petals folded together in a beautiful sphere, and looking like a drop of the purest pearl.
The white stairs, the deep crimson of the carpet, and the light blue of the dress made an effective combination of colour to set off the delicate carnation of that face, which, after the first glance given to the whole person, drew irresistibly your gaze to itself by an indefinable quality of charm beyond all analysis and made you think of remote races, of strange generations, of the faces of women sculptured on immemorial monuments and of those lying unsung in their tombs.
The colors that show best by candle-light are white, carnation, and a kind of sea-water-green; and oes, or spangs, as they are of no great cost, so they are of most glory.
Her countenance, a natural carnation slightly embrowned by the season, had deepened its tinge with the beating of the rain-drops; and her hair, which the pressure of the cows' flanks had, as usual, caused to tumble down from its fastenings and stray beyond the curtain of her calico bonnet, was made clammy by the moisture, till it hardly was better than seaweed.
Da Souza was gorgeous in frock coat and silk hat, a carnation in his buttonhole, a diamond in his black satin tie, yet he was not altogether happy.
A nod to Miss Judson sent her to open the door, and entered two policemen, a police sergeant, and a professionally whiskered person in a business suit with a carnation in his button-hole.
The carnations of the painting had withered, but the eyes were still wonderful in their depth and brilliancy of colour.
The roof was all of crimson roses, the windows of lilies, the walls of white carnations, the floors of glowing auriculas and violets, the doors of gorgeous tulips and narcissi with sunflowers for knockers, and all round hyacinths and other sweet-smelling flowers bloomed in masses, so that the air was perfumed far and near and enchanted all who were present.