carnival


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Related to carnival: cruises

car·ni·val

 (kär′nə-vəl)
n.
1. often Carnival The period of merrymaking and feasting celebrated just before Lent.
2. A traveling amusement show usually including rides, games, and sideshows.
3. A festival or revel: winter carnival.

[Italian carnevale, from Old Italian carnelevare, Shrovetide : carne, meat (from Latin carō, carn-; see sker- in Indo-European roots) + levare, to remove (from Latin levāre, to raise; see legwh- in Indo-European roots).]

carnival

(ˈkɑːnɪvəl)
n
1.
a. a festive occasion or period marked by merrymaking, processions, etc: esp in some Roman Catholic countries, the period just before Lent
b. (as modifier): a carnival atmosphere.
2. a travelling fair having merry-go-rounds, etc
3. a show or display arranged as an amusement
4. Austral a sports meeting
[C16: from Italian carnevale, from Old Italian carnelevare a removing of meat (referring to the Lenten fast)]

car•ni•val

(ˈkɑr nə vəl)

n.
1. a traveling amusement show having sideshows and rides.
2. a festival: a winter carnival of sports and games.
3. the season immediately preceding Lent, often observed with merrymaking.
[1540–50; < Italian carnevale, early Italian carnelevare taking meat away =carne flesh + levare < Latin levāre to lift]

fair

carnival
1. 'fair'

In British English, a fair is an event held in a park or field at which people pay to ride on various machines for amusement or try to win prizes in games.

...all the fun of the fair, with dodgem cars, stalls, candy floss and children's rides.
2. 'carnival'

In American English, an event like this is called a carnival.

It reminds me of when the carnival came to Hudson Falls, N.Y., when I was a boy.

In British English, a carnival is an outdoor public festival which is held every year in a particular place. During a carnival, music is played and people sometimes dance in the streets.

The Notting Hill Carnival in August is the largest street festival in Europe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carnival - a festival marked by merrymaking and processionscarnival - a festival marked by merrymaking and processions
festival, fete - an organized series of acts and performances (usually in one place); "a drama festival"
Fat Tuesday, Mardi Gras - a carnival held in some countries on Shrove Tuesday (the last day before Lent) but especially in New Orleans
2.carnival - a frenetic disorganized (and often comic) disturbance suggestive of a large public entertainment; "it was so funny it was a circus"; "the whole occasion had a carnival atmosphere"
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
3.carnival - a traveling showcarnival - a traveling show; having sideshows and rides and games of skill etc.
show - the act of publicly exhibiting or entertaining; "a remarkable show of skill"
midway - the place at a fair or carnival where sideshows and similar amusements are located

carnival

noun
1. festival, fair, fête, celebration, gala, jubilee, jamboree, Mardi Gras, revelry, merrymaking, fiesta, holiday The town is best known for its carnivals with masked balls and firework processions.
2. funfair circus a carnival with rides and games
Translations
كَرْنَفَالكَرنفال: احْتِفال مَسيرات عُمومي
karneval
karneval
karnevaali
karneval
karnevál
kjötkveîjuhátíî, karnival
カーニバル
카니발
karnavalas
karnevāls
karneval
karneval
karneval
งานฉลองของมวลชน
ngày hội

carnival

[ˈkɑːnɪvəl]
A. Ncarnaval m (US) → parque m de atracciones
B. CPD carnival queen Nreina f del carnaval or de la fiesta

carnival

[ˈkɑːrnɪvəl] n
(= public celebration) → carnaval m
(US) (= funfair) → fête foraine

carnival

nVolksfest nt; (= village carnival etc)Schützenfest nt; (based on religion) → Karneval m
attrFest-, Karnevals-; carnival processionFest-/Karnevalszug m

carnival

[ˈkɑːnɪvl] n (public celebration) → carnevale m (Am) (funfair) → luna park m inv

carnival

(ˈkaːnivəl) noun
a public entertainment, often involving processions of people in fancy dress etc. a winter carnival.

carnival

كَرْنَفَال karneval karneval Karneval καρναβάλι carnaval, feria karnevaali carnaval karneval carnevale カーニバル 카니발 carnaval karneval karnawał carnaval карнавал karneval งานฉลองของมวลชน karnaval ngày hội 狂欢节
References in classic literature ?
Many nations are represented, many languages spoken, many costumes worn, and on a sunny day the spectacle is as gay and brilliant as a carnival.
If Miss Ophelia, after three or four days of careful patient supervision, was so sanguine as to suppose that Topsy had at last fallen into her way, could do without over-looking, and so go off and busy herself about something else, Topsy would hold a perfect carnival of confusion, for some one or two hours.
Aunt Jane helped clear the table and put away the food, while Miranda entertained in the parlor; but Rebecca and the infant Burches washed the dishes and held high carnival in the kitchen, doing only trifling damage--breaking a cup and plate that had been cracked before, emptying a silver spoon with some dishwater out of the back door (an act never permitted at the brick house), and putting coffee grounds in the sink.
You are a beautiful and luxurious creature: life is to you full and complete only when it is a carnival of love.
It was about dusk, one evening during the supreme madness of the carnival season, that I encountered my friend.
There are great, frowning precipices and much falling water, and Nature seem to have held sometime her carnival.
These descendants of the sect of Zoroaster--the most thrifty, civilised, intelligent, and austere of the East Indians, among whom are counted the richest native merchants of Bombay--were celebrating a sort of religious carnival, with processions and shows, in the midst of which Indian dancing-girls, clothed in rose-coloured gauze, looped up with gold and silver, danced airily, but with perfect modesty, to the sound of viols and the clanging of tambourines.
They had agreed to see the Carnival at Rome that year, and that Franz, who for the last three or four years had inhabited Italy, should act as cicerone to Albert.
On a day of the carnival he had taken a notion to provide an unusual entertainment for that good town, of which he was the life and soul.
This wedlock was more serious than most affairs of Merry Mount, where jest and delusion, trick and fantasy, kept up a continual carnival.
Here the buffaloes were in immense herds; and here they remained for three days, slaying and cooking, and feasting, and indemnifying themselves by an enormous carnival, for a long and hungry Lent.
corso, of a carnival = the Corso, a main street in Rome, at Carnival time}

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