carnivalesque


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carnivalesque

(ˌkɑːnɪvəˈlɛsk)
adj
characteristic of, suitable for, or like a carnival
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References in classic literature ?
It was based on the deep persuasion that the man at my side was insane with quite another than Carnivalesque lunacy which comes on at one stated time of the year.
In his book on Rabelais, Bakhtin (1965) mentions Shakespeare's name several times, but never focuses on him: Shakespeare only makes his appearances as a background figure within the compass of Bakhtins carnivalesque theory.
Ultimately, the carnivalesque project of The Path to Rome was an attempt to influence the future of Europe by returning it to its Christian past.
Thus, in the carnivalesque relativity that penetrates these stories, animals become blood relations and blood relations are quarry.
And so, eventually, Tellez's videos and films--with their carnivalesque admixture of fiction and document, fantasia and poetic plainness--were born.
This carnivalesque quality is not mere parody, but a cunning, learned game that
But rest assured that this fascinating staging of the Elizabethan horror story, here presented with excellent movement, trapeze work and elements of the carnivalesque, comes off triumphantly and does great credit to Stewart McGill who directed the evening.
165), the carnivalesque, which is an "inversion of rank .
And this would appear to make sense, if one were to examine puritans, as Poole does, through their opponents lens: "Religious radicalism -- with its emphasis on the individual conscience and its arguments for voluntary religion," she writes, "threatened conceptual social foundations" such as family, church, and state, and thus led to carnivalesque and exaggerated portrayals (13).
Whereas Reed's novel explodes into possibilities and multiple stories, into hilarity and paradox, Rushdy sacrifices aesthetic complexity to the univocal in order to find the political agenda hidden behind carnivalesque grotesquerie.
As Wickens suggests, these are the very effects that can be seen in such episodes in the novels as the skimmity-ride in The major of Casterbridge--a carnivalesque "moment of absolute reversal, when the master and slave switch positions" (Wickens 111).
27) legitimizing emerging elites who adopted the arts of the aristocracy and set themselves apart from traditionalist carnivalesque popular culture.