carnivalesque


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carnivalesque

(ˌkɑːnɪvəˈlɛsk)
adj
characteristic of, suitable for, or like a carnival
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It was based on the deep persuasion that the man at my side was insane with quite another than Carnivalesque lunacy which comes on at one stated time of the year.
We argue in this article for the potential of the carnivalesque to promote creative engagement with, and opposition to, contemporary systems and ideas.
It's hard to say, but whether in Spain, Mexico, Guatemala or the Philippines, note the Mardi Gras-type activities, the Mardi Gras being another example of carnivalesque, a last wild fling on the streets before the start of Lent and penance.
It is a carnivalesque attack, not just on "the ideology of date rape," but on all the polite conventions of academic discourse.
But any close look at Krampus practices reveals a rather different impulse at work as well: In these carnivalesque traditions, participants are "freed to act out" and to "create tumult wherever they go.
Locating Robin Hood and the Carnivalesque in the U.
She asserts that it was only in the twentieth century that the carnivalesque rose to mainstream comic aesthetics.
The author describes how satire and parody challenge ruling elites' propaganda to reconstruct it absurdly and undermine its original purpose; how carnivalesque activities transform the protest atmosphere from antagonism to cheerfulness; and how carnivalesque protests use the metaphor of participants' emancipation from an oppressive situation.
In his book on Rabelais, Bakhtin (1965) mentions Shakespeare's name several times, but never focuses on him: Shakespeare only makes his appearances as a background figure within the compass of Bakhtins carnivalesque theory.
Along with the contaminating and unreluctant hypersociability, such manifestations indicate a festive atmosphere of the carnivalesque kind.
What if, on the contrary, in order for us to interact in public with our true face, we have to have a mask hidden somewhere, a mask which renders our unbearable excess, what is in us more than ourselves, a mask which we can put on only exceptionally, in those carnivalesque moments when the standard rules of interaction are suspended?
The work draws unlikely parallels between seemingly disparate cultural references, nodding to literature, art history, pagan ritual, cinema, fashion and the carnivalesque.