carotid sinus

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Related to carotid bulb: carotid artery, Carotid stenosis

carotid sinus

n.
A dilated area located at the bifurcations of the carotid arteries and containing numerous baroreceptors that function in the control of blood pressure by mediating changes in the heart rate.
Translations

ca·rot·id si·nus

n. sinus (seno) de la carótida, pequeña dilatación de la arteria carótida y su bifurcación.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During periods of diastole, the image was frozen and the measurements were assessed 1cm proximal and distal to carotid bulb on both sides away from atherosclerotic plaque.
14) Three segments were measured in each side (Common Carotid Artery, Carotid Bulb Region and Internal Carotid Artery) and Composite CIMT was calculated by taking the mean of the right and left segmental mean thicknesses.
This focal widening of the bifurcation extends over approximately 1 cm and is labeled the carotid bulb or bifurcation (CB).
Technically, it has been usually measured in CCA, rather than the carotid bulb or internal carotid artery, because CCA is easily visualized perpendicular to the ultrasound beam and provides more accurate, reproducible, and quantitative measurement (20).
MRI provides details about how soft tissue is affected by the tumor, and it may detect carotid bulb and jugular vein occlusion.
The US findings in these three patients (with hepatitis) showed focal homogenous echogenic plaque resting on the anterior wall of the common carotid bulb that measured 5x1.
We only looked at the common CIMT and did not examine the intima-media thicknesses in the carotid bulb or the internal carotid artery; the evaluation of atherosclerosis in these segments may vary.
The mid and distal portions of the common carotid artery, carotid bulb, and the proximal portions of the internal and external carotid arteries were systematically examined manually in short-axis and long-axis views.
With the patient in a supine position with slight cervical hyperextension, the CIMT measurements were assessed in a sagittal plane, 1 cm proximal to the carotid bulb on the posterior wall of a plaque-free region.
Stenosis is most significant at the carotid bifurcation, also known as the carotid bulb, where the common carotid artery branches into the internal and external carotid arteries.