carotid

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Related to carotids: monofilament, Carotenoids

ca·rot·id

 (kə-rŏt′ĭd)
n.
Either of the two major arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry blood to the head.
adj.
Of or relating to either of these arteries.

[French carotide, from Greek karōtides, carotid arteries, from karoun, to stupefy (because compression of these arteries causes loss of consciousness); see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

carotid

(kəˈrɒtɪd) or

carotid artery

n
(Anatomy) either one of the two principal arteries that supply blood to the head and neck
adj
(Anatomy) of or relating to either of these arteries
[C17: from French, from Greek karōtides, from karoun to stupefy; so named by Galen, because pressure on them produced unconsciousness]
caˈrotidal adj

ca•rot•id

(kəˈrɒt ɪd)

n.
1. Also called carot′id ar`tery. either of two large arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry blood from the aorta to the head.
adj.
2. pertaining to a carotid artery.
[1660–70; < Greek karōtídes neck arteries]
ca•rot′id•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.carotid - of or relating to either of the two major arteries supplying blood to the head and neck
Translations

carotid

[kəˈrɒtɪd] N (also carotid artery) → carótida f

carotid (artery)

nHalsschlagader f, → Karotide f (spec)

ca·rot·id

n. carótida, arteria una de las dos arterias del cuello;
___ arteriesarterias ___ -s;
___ sinusseno de la ___;
___ sinus syncopesíncope del seno de la ___.

carotid

adj carotideo, (artery) carótido
References in classic literature ?
He knew enough anatomy to make pretty certain of getting the carotid artery.
Two thumbs pressed into his neck on either side of the windpipe directly on the carotid arteries, shutting off the blood to his brain and giving him most exquisite agony, at the same time rendering him unconscious far more swiftly than the swiftest anaesthetic.
It was pierced by a very small but very deep wound, which had divided the carotid artery.
If atherosclerosis results in significant stenosis (narrowing) of the carotids, you may require a surgery known as carotid endarterectomy or minimally invasive angioplasty with stenting to unclog them, especially if you've experienced symptoms.
The tumour was exposed after dissecting the carotids.
There are four major vessels supplying the brain--two internal carotids and two vertebrals.
2) The tumor location is variable, posterior to the bifurcation of the common carotid artery or partially wedged in between the internal and external carotids.
In the past decade, some doctors have tested stenting on blocked carotids.
3,8,9) Again, medialized carotids must be located and defined prior to surgical intervention.
Pathologists have discovered during autopsies that some patients with blocked carotids had established sufficient auxiliary circulation through their vertebral arteries in the back of the neck.
As we age, fatty deposits of cholesterol, calcium and blood platelets (typically known as plaque) build up inside arteries, including the carotids, and cause atherosclerotic disease.
Rupture of the carotids following radical neck surgery in irradiated patients.