carrion


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Related to carrion: carrion flower

car·ri·on

 (kăr′ē-ən)
n.
Dead and decaying flesh.
adj.
1. Of or similar to dead and decaying flesh.
2. Feeding on such flesh.

[Middle English careine, from Anglo-Norman, from Vulgar Latin *carōnia, from Latin carō, flesh; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

carrion

(ˈkærɪən)
n
1. dead and rotting flesh
2. (Zoology) (modifier) eating carrion: carrion beetles.
3. something rotten or repulsive
[C13: from Anglo-French caroine, ultimately from Latin carō flesh]

car•ri•on

(ˈkær i ən)

n.
1. dead and putrefying flesh.
adj.
2. feeding on carrion.
[1175–1225; Middle English careyn, carion < Anglo-French careine, Old French charo(i)gne < Vulgar Latin *caronia= Latin carun- (see caruncle) + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carrion - the dead and rotting body of an animalcarrion - the dead and rotting body of an animal; unfit for human food
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"
Translations
جِيفَـه
mršinazdechlina
ådsel
hræ
dvėsenamaita
maita
zdochlina

carrion

[ˈkærɪən]
A. Ncarroña f
B. CPD carrion crow Ncorneja f negra

carrion

[ˈkærɪən] ncharogne f

carrion

nAas nt

carrion

[ˈkærɪən] ncarogna

carrion

(ˈkӕriən) noun
dead animal flesh, eaten by other animals. Vultures feed on carrion.
References in classic literature ?
I regret to add, that he wrote, also, 'The Buzzard's Feast,' in which a carrion diet is contumeliously disparaged.
That I should have lived to witness the reality of the fabled Carrion Caves
To these observations I may add, on the high authority of Azara, that the Carrancha feeds on worms, shells, slugs, grasshoppers, and frogs; that it destroys young lambs by tearing the umbilical cord; and that it pursues the Gallinazo, till that bird is compelled to vomit up the carrion it may have recently gorged.
Wheat he gave to rich folk, millet to the poor, Broken scraps for holy men that beg from door to door; Battle to the tiger, carrion to the kite, And rags and bones to wicked wolves without the wall at night.
And beside him, equally hideous, stood two powerful hyenas--carrion-eaters consorting with carrion.
Greedy for carrion, and sure that this must be a fresh corpse, the bird swooped down upon the boy.
The blue-gray bandy legged dog ran merrily along the side of the road, sometimes in proof of its agility and self-satisfaction lifting one hind leg and hopping along on three, and then again going on all four and rushing to bark at the crows that sat on the carrion.
And I shall know that I must die, at sea most likely, cease crawling of myself to be all a-crawl with the corruption of the sea; to be fed upon, to be carrion, to yield up all the strength and movement of my muscles that it may become strength and movement in fin and scale and the guts of fishes.
Tarzan of the Apes is not for Ska, eater of carrion.
But even granting the charge in question to be true; what disordered slippery decks of a whale-ship are comparable to the unspeakable carrion of those battle-fields from which so many soldiers return to drink in all ladies' plaudits?
The HOUYHNHNMS keep the YAHOOS for present use in huts not far from the house; but the rest are sent abroad to certain fields, where they dig up roots, eat several kinds of herbs, and search about for carrion, or sometimes catch weasels and LUHIMUHS (a sort of wild rat), which they greedily devour.
On the following Tuesday I was out with my dog and gun, in pursuit of such game as I could find within the territory of Linden-Car; but finding none at all, I turned my arms against the hawks and carrion crows, whose depredations, as I suspected, had deprived me of better prey.