carry off


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Related to carry off: in earnest, get along, carry out, carry through, start off, trip up

car·ry

 (kăr′ē)
v. car·ried, car·ry·ing, car·ries
v.tr.
1. To hold or support while moving; bear: carried the baby in my arms; carrying a heavy backpack.
2.
a. To move or take from one place to another; transport: a train carrying freight; a courier carrying messages.
b. Chiefly Southern US To escort or accompany.
3. To serve as a means for the conveyance of; transmit: pipes that carry waste water; a bridge that carries traffic between the two cities.
4.
a. To communicate; pass on: The news was carried by word of mouth to every settlement.
b. To express or contain: harsh words that carried a threat of violence.
5. To have (something) on the surface or skin; bear: carries scars from acne.
6. To hold or be capable of holding: The tank carries 16 gallons when full.
7.
a. To support (a weight or responsibility).
b. To support the weight or responsibility of: a beam that carries the floor; a student who carries a heavy course load.
8. To keep or have on one's person: stopped carrying credit cards.
9. To be pregnant with (offspring).
10.
a. To hold and move (the body or a part of it) in a particular way: carried her head proudly.
b. To behave or conduct (oneself) in a specified manner.
11. To extend or continue in space, time, or degree: carried the line to the edge of the page; carry a joke too far.
12.
a. To give impetus to; propel: The wind carried the ball over the fence.
b. To take further; advance: carry a cause.
13. To take or seize, especially by force; capture.
14.
a. To be successful in; win: lost the game but carried the match.
b. To gain victory, support, or acceptance for: The motion was carried in a close vote.
c. To win a majority of the votes in: Roosevelt carried all but two states in the 1936 presidential election.
d. To gain the sympathy of; win over: The amateurs' enthusiasm carried the audience.
15. To include or keep on a list: carried a dozen workers on the payroll.
16.
a. To have as an attribute or accompaniment: an appliance carrying a full-year guarantee.
b. To involve as a condition, consequence, or effect: The crime carried a five-year sentence.
17. Physics To possess (an intrinsic property, such as color charge) or convey (a force) that governs particle interactions.
18. To transfer from one place, as a column, page, or book, to another: carry a number in addition.
19. To keep in stock; offer for sale: a store that carries a full line of electronic equipment.
20. To keep in one's accounts as a debtor: carried the unemployed customer for 90 days.
21.
a. To maintain or support (one that is weaker or less competent, for example).
b. To compensate for (a weaker member or partner) by one's performance.
22. To place before the public; print or broadcast: The morning papers carried the story. The press conference was carried by all networks.
23. To produce as a crop.
24. To provide forage for (livestock): land that carries sheep.
25. To sing (a melody, for example) on key: carry a tune.
26. Nautical To be equipped with (a mast or sail).
27. Sports
a. To cover (a distance) or advance beyond (a point or object) in one golf stroke.
b. To control and advance (a ball or puck).
c. Basketball To palm (the ball) in violation of the rules.
v.intr.
1. To act as a bearer: teach a dog to fetch and carry.
2. To be transmitted or conveyed: a voice that carries well.
3. To admit of being transported: Unbalanced loads do not carry easily.
4. To hold the neck and head in a certain way. Used of a horse.
5. To be accepted or approved: The proposal carried by a wide margin.
n. pl. car·ries
1.
a. The act or process of carrying.
b. A portage, as between two navigable bodies of water.
c. Football An act of running with the ball on an offensive play from scrimmage: a carry of six yards.
2.
a. The range of a gun or projectile.
b. The distance traveled by a hurled or struck ball.
c. Reach; projection: "a voice that had far more carry to it than at any time in the term thus far" (Jimmy Breslin).
Phrasal Verbs:
carry away
To move or excite greatly: was carried away by desire.
carry forward
Accounting To transfer (an entry) to the next column, page, or book, or to another account.
carry off
1. To cause the death of: was carried off by a fever.
2. To handle successfully: carried off the difficult situation with aplomb.
carry on
1. To conduct; maintain: carry on a thriving business.
2. To engage in: carry on a love affair.
3. To continue without halting; persevere: carry on in the face of disaster.
4. To behave in an excited, improper, or silly manner.
carry out
1. To put into practice or effect: carry out a new policy.
2. To follow or obey: carry out instructions.
3. To bring to a conclusion; accomplish: carried out the mission successfully.
carry over
1. Accounting
a. To transfer (an account) to the next column, page, or book relating to the same account.
b. To retain (merchandise or other goods) for a subsequent, usually the next, season.
2. To deduct (an unused tax credit or a loss, for example) for taxable income of a subsequent period.
3. To persist to another time or situation: The confidence gained in remedial classes carried over into the children's regular school work.
carry through
1. To accomplish; complete: carry a project through despite difficulties.
2. To survive; persist: prejudices that have carried through over the centuries.
3. To enable to endure; sustain: a faith that carried them through the ordeal.
Idioms:
carry (someone's) water
To support someone, especially in an submissive or uncritical manner.
carry the ball Informal
To assume the leading role; do most of the work.
carry the day
To be victorious or successful.

[Middle English carien, from Old North French carier, from carre, cart; see car.]
Synonyms: carry, bear1, convey, transport
These verbs mean to move while holding or supporting something. Carry is the most general: The hikers were carrying backpacks and sleeping bags. The train carries baggage, mail, and passengers. Bear can denote the movement of heavy loads: The river barges bore grain and coal downriver. It can also suggest formality or ceremony: The sergeant at arms entered the chamber bearing the mace. Convey often implies continuous movement or flow: A moving belt conveyed the parts along the assembly line. Transport emphasizes movement of goods or people from one place to another: Refrigerated trucks were used to transport the milk from farm to market. Buses stood by to transport the evacuees to area shelters.

carry off

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to remove forcefully
2. to win: he carried off all the prizes.
3. to manage or handle (a situation) successfully: he carried off the introductions well.
4. to cause to die: he was carried off by pneumonia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.carry off - be successful; achieve a goal; "She succeeded in persuading us all"; "I managed to carry the box upstairs"; "She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it"; "The pianist negociated the difficult runs"
bring home the bacon, deliver the goods, succeed, win, come through - attain success or reach a desired goal; "The enterprise succeeded"; "We succeeded in getting tickets to the show"; "she struggled to overcome her handicap and won"
2.carry off - remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional statecarry off - remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state; "Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands"; "The car carried us off to the meeting"; "I'll take you away on a holiday"; "I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
spirit away - carry away rapidly and secretly, as if mysteriously
spirit away, spirit off - carry off mysteriously; as if by magic
whisk away, whisk off - take away quickly and suddenly
3.carry off - kill in large numbers; "the plague wiped out an entire population"
decimate - kill one in every ten, as of mutineers in Roman armies
kill - cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly; "This man killed several people when he tried to rob a bank"; "The farmer killed a pig for the holidays"

carry

verb
1. To move while supporting:
Informal: tote.
Slang: schlep.
2. To cause to come along with oneself:
3. To serve as a conduit:
5. To cause (a disease) to pass to another or others:
6. To hold up:
7. To sustain the weight of:
8. To hold on one's person:
Informal: pack.
9. To conduct oneself in a specified way:
10. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
11. To be accepted or approved:
12. To be endowed with as a visible characteristic or form:
13. To have as an accompaniment, a condition, or a consequence:
14. To have for sale:
phrasal verb
carry away
To move or excite greatly:
Slang: send.
phrasal verb
carry off
To cause the death of:
Slang: waste, zap.
phrasal verb
carry on
1. To control the course of (an activity):
2. To involve oneself in (an activity):
Idiom: take part.
3. To engage in (a war or campaign, for example):
4. To continue without halting despite difficulties or setbacks:
Idioms: hang in there, keep going , keep it up.
5. To show enthusiasm:
6. To behave in a rowdy, improper, or unruly fashion:
Informal: cut up, horse around.
phrasal verb
carry out
1. To oversee the provision or execution of:
2. To engage in (a war or campaign, for example):
3. To compel observance of:
Idioms: put in force, put into action.
4. To act in conformity with:
Idiom: toe the line.
5. To bring about and carry to a successful conclusion:
Informal: swing.
phrasal verb
carry through
To bring about and carry to a successful conclusion:
Informal: swing.
Translations
يَحْمِلُ وَيُبْعِدُ
odnést
fjerne
fara meî í fanginu
alıp götürmek

w>carry off

vt sep
(= seize, carry away)wegtragen
(= win) prizes, medalsgewinnen, mit nach Hause nehmen (inf)
to carry it offes hinkriegen (inf)
(= kill)(hin)wegraffen (geh)

carry

(ˈkӕri) verb
1. to take from one place etc to another. She carried the child over the river; Flies carry disease.
2. to go from one place to another. Sound carries better over water.
3. to support. These stone columns carry the weight of the whole building.
4. to have or hold. This job carries great responsibility.
5. to approve (a bill etc) by a majority of votes. The parliamentary bill was carried by forty-two votes.
6. to hold (oneself) in a certain way. He carries himself like a soldier.
ˈcarry-all noun
(American) a hold-all.
ˈcarry-cot noun
(American portacrib®) a small bed, like a basket, with handles for carrying a baby.
be/get carried away
to be overcome by one's feelings. She was/got carried away by the excitement.
carry forward
to add on (a number from one column of figures to the next). I forgot to carry the 2 forward.
carry off
to take away by carrying. She carried off the screaming child.
carry on
1. to continue. You must carry on working; Carry on with your work.
2. to manage (a business etc). He carries on a business as a grocer.
carry-on (ˈkari-on) noun
(slang) a fuss; excited behaviour.
carry-on (ˈkari-on) adjective
(of bags or cases) that passengers can carry with them on board a plane.
carry out
to accomplish. He carried out the plan.
carry weight
to have influence. His opinion carries a lot of weight around here.
References in classic literature ?
We will now talk about yourself a little, if you have no objection: you were to carry off Mlle.
I tell thee,'' said De Bracy, ``that I mean to purvey me a wife after the fashion of the tribe of Benjamin; which is as much as to say, that in this same equipment I will fall upon that herd of Saxon bullocks, who have this night left the castle, and carry off from them the lovely Rowena.
The tails tapering down that way, serve to carry off the water, d'ye see.
The two elder brothers would have pulled it down, in order to see how the poor ants in their fright would run about and carry off their eggs.
But as ants, which are not slave-makers, will, as I have seen, carry off pupae of other species, if scattered near their nests, it is possible that pupae originally stored as food might become developed; and the ants thus unintentionally reared would then follow their proper instincts, and do what work they could.
This relation was confirmed by the Moorish officer who came with us, who, as he said, had lost a servant in that manner: the man certainly fell into the hands of the Galles, who lurk in those dark retreats, cut the throats of the merchants, and carry off their effects.