carte


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Carte

 (kärt), Richard D'Oyly 1844-1901.
British impresario whose Savoy Theatre premiered many of the operettas of W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan.

carte

(kɑːt)
n
(Fencing) a variant spelling of quarte

Carte

(kɑːt)
n
(Biography) See D'Oyly Carte

Carte

(kɑrt)

n.
Richard d'Oyly, 1844–1901, English theatrical producer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Carte - a list of dishes available at a restaurantcarte - a list of dishes available at a restaurant; "the menu was in French"
bill - a list of particulars (as a playbill or bill of fare)
a la carte - a menu having individual dishes listed with separate prices
prix fixe - a menu listing fixed meals at fixed prices
table d'hote - a menu offering a complete meal with limited choices at a fixed price
References in classic literature ?
I had previously taken a journey to S- to purchase some new furniture: my cousins having given me CARTE BLANCHE TO effect what alterations I pleased, and a sum having been set aside for that purpose.
de Treville, or whether he should only ask him to give him CARTE BLANCHE for some secret affair.
My grandfather has given me carte blanche for once, and I promise you the entertainment shall be worthy of the occasion.
If I were Brooke, I would choke the `Trumpet' at once by getting Garth to make a new valuation of the farms, and giving him carte blanche about gates and repairs: that's my view of the political situation," said the Rector, broadening himself by sticking his thumbs in his armholes, and laughing towards Mr.
I'll give you carte blanche as to what you serve, but it must be of the best.
You know, Monsieur Poirot, that you have carte blanche in every way.
To-day, however, being the School-house match, none of the School-house prepostors stay by the door to watch for truants of their side; there is carte blanche to the School-house fags to go where they like.
Quadroon, with carte blanche on the Slave question); indeed the family estate was much embarrassed, and the income drawn from the borough was of great use to the house of Queen's Crawley.
He gives me carte blanche in the matter, and, I verily believe, would throw in a blank check if asked.
The inside surfaces of the two doors were completely covered with CARTES DE VISITE of former prisoners, ingeniously let into the wood and protected from dirt and injury by glass.
We'll take a dram for luck, and as soon as this handless man of mine has the collops ready, we'll dine and take a hand at the cartes as gentlemen should.
But the gentleman is tired, and should sleep; if he has no mind to the cartes, it will never hinder you and me.