cartilage


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Related to cartilage: hyaline cartilage, articular cartilage

car·ti·lage

 (kär′tl-ĭj)
n.
A tough, elastic, fibrous connective tissue that is a major constituent of the embryonic and young vertebrate skeleton and in most species is converted largely to bone with maturation. It is found in various parts of the human body, such as the joints, outer ear, and larynx.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cartilāgō, cartilāgin-.]

cartilage

(ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ; ˈkɑːtlɪdʒ)
n
(Anatomy) a tough elastic tissue composing most of the embryonic skeleton of vertebrates. In the adults of higher vertebrates it is mostly converted into bone, remaining only on the articulating ends of bones, in the thorax, trachea, nose, and ears. Nontechnical name: gristle
[C16: from Latin cartilāgō]
cartilaginous adj

car•ti•lage

(ˈkɑr tl ɪdʒ, ˈkɑrt lɪdʒ)

n.
1. a firm, elastic, whitish type of connective tissue; gristle.
2. a part or structure composed of cartilage.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin cartilāgō gristle]

car·ti·lage

(kär′tl-ĭj)
A strong, flexible connective tissue that is found in various parts of the body, including the joints, the outer ear, and the larynx. In the early development of most vertebrates, the skeleton forms as cartilage before most of it hardens into bone.

cartilaginous adjective

cartilage

Gristle; dense, white connective tissue cushioning bones and supporting parts of the ear and respiratory system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cartilage - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
meniscus, semilunar cartilage - (anatomy) a disk of cartilage that serves as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet at a joint
fibrocartilage - cartilage that is largely composed of fibers like those in ordinary connective tissue
hyaline cartilage - translucent cartilage that is common in joints and the respiratory passages; forms most of the fetal skeleton
arytaenoid, arytenoid, arytenoid cartilage - either of two small cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal folds are attached
thyroid cartilage, Adam's apple - the largest cartilage of the larynx
cartilaginous structure - body structure given shape by cartilage
ground substance, intercellular substance, matrix - the body substance in which tissue cells are embedded
Translations
غضْروف
chrupavka
brusk
rusto
brjósk
軟骨
cartilago
kremzlė
skrimslis
chrupavka
kıkırdakkıkırdak doku

cartilage

[ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ] Ncartílago m

cartilage

[ˈkɑːrtɪlɪdʒ] n (ANATOMY)cartilage m

cartilage

nKnorpel m

cartilage

[ˈkɑːtɪlɪdʒ] ncartilagine f

cartilage

(ˈkaːtəlidʒ) noun
a firm elastic substance found in the bodies of men and animals.

car·ti·lage

n. cartílago, tejido semiduro que cubre los huesos.

cartilage

n cartílago
References in classic literature ?
I didn't laugh -- I am always thankful for that -- but the strain ruptured every cartilage in me, and for weeks afterward I could hear my bones clack when I walked.
Her clean-cut head with prominent, bright, spirited eyes, broadened out at the open nostrils, that showed the red blood in the cartilage within.
It was about six inches long, and thicker than my thumb, with some indications of dried cartilage at one end of it.
You will observe from the cartilage that this is no fossil specimen, but recent.
Once, in a rage, Bunster ripped the cup handle from Mauki's nose, tearing the hole clear out of the cartilage.
At the thought I called to Woola to leap upon the creature's head and hang there, and as his mighty jaws closed upon that fiendish face, and glistening fangs buried themselves in the bone and cartilage and lower part of one of the huge eyes, I dived beneath the great body as the creature rose, dragging Woola from the ground, that it might bring its sting beneath and pierce the body of the thing hanging to its head.
he objurgated, as, this time, the reason he referred to was the introduction of the ring clear through both nostrils, higher up, and through the central dividing wall of cartilage.
Long-Beard laughed, too, the five-inch bodkin of bone, thrust midway through the cartilage of his nose, leaping and dancing and adding to his ferocious appearance.
It is in the upper part of this enormous head, in great cavities divided by cartilages, that is to be found from six to eight hundred pounds of that precious oil called spermaceti.
Well, I selected the cartilages of the heads of these fishes, and you can scarcely imagine the delight with which I welcomed the arrival of each Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, as affording me the means of increasing my stock of pens; for I will freely confess that my historical labors have been my greatest solace and relief.
The medallion was the only ornament he wore, although enormous slits in the rim of either ear, which suffered the cartilages to fall two inches below the members, had evidently been used for the purposes of decoration in other days.
The ornaments that were ordinarily pendant from the cartilages of his ears had been removed, on account of his present pursuit.