casket


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cas·ket

 (kăs′kĭt)
n.
1. A coffin.
2. A small case or chest, as for jewels and other valuables.
tr.v. cas·ket·ed, cas·ket·ing, cas·kets
To enclose in a case, chest, or coffin.

[Middle English, possibly alteration of Old French cassette; see cassette.]

casket

(ˈkɑːskɪt)
n
1. a small box or chest for valuables, esp jewels
2. chiefly US another name for coffin1
[C15: probably from Old French cassette little box; see case2]

cas•ket

(ˈkæs kɪt, ˈkɑ skɪt)

n.
1. a coffin.
2. a small chest or box, as for jewels.
v.t.
3. to put or enclose in a casket.
[1425–75; late Middle English; of uncertain orig.]

Casket, Casquet

 a small chest, as of jewels; a selection of literary or musical gems.
Examples: casket of jewels; of literary selections; of musical selections; of songs, 1850.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.casket - box in which a corpse is buried or crematedcasket - box in which a corpse is buried or cremated
bier - a coffin along with its stand; "we followed the bier to the graveyard"
box - a (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid; "he rummaged through a box of spare parts"
sarcophagus - a stone coffin (usually bearing sculpture or inscriptions)
2.casket - small and often ornate box for holding jewels or other valuablescasket - small and often ornate box for holding jewels or other valuables
box - a (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid; "he rummaged through a box of spare parts"
Verb1.casket - enclose in a casket
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"

casket

noun
1. box, case, chest, coffer, ark (dialect), jewel box, coffret, kist (Scot. & Northern English dialect) a jewellery casket made from French walnut
2. coffin, sarcophagus The casket was slowly lowered into the open grave.
Translations
عُلْبَةٌ لِحِفْظِ المُجَوْهَراتنَعْش، تابوت
rakevskříňka na šperky
kisteskrin
ékszerládikaérckoporsó
askja, skrínlíkkista
dėžutėkarstas
šķirstiņšzārks
mücevher kutusutabut

casket

[ˈkɑːskɪt] N (for jewels) → estuche m, cofre m (esp US) (= coffin) → ataúd m

casket

[ˈkɑːskɪt] n
(= small box) → coffret m
(US) (= coffin) → cercueil m

casket

nSchatulle f; (for cremated ashes) → Urne f; (US: = coffin) → Sarg m, → Totenschrein m (geh)

casket

[ˈkɑːskɪt] n (for jewels) → scrigno, cofanetto (Am) (coffin) → bara

casket

(ˈkaːskit) noun
1. a small case for holding jewels etc.
2. (especially American) a coffin.

casket

n. ataúd, caja.
References in classic literature ?
Setting out in their canoes, after a perilous passage they discovered the island, and there they found an empty ivory casket, --the poor little Indian's skeleton.
So like a choice casket is it secreted in him, that I have known some whalemen who peremptorily deny that the Sperm Whale has any other brain than that palpable semblance of one formed by the cubic-yards of his sperm magazine.
The next morning Sandy assembled the swine in the dining-room and gave them their breakfast, waiting upon them personally and manifesting in every way the deep reverence which the natives of her island, ancient and modern, have always felt for rank, let its outward casket and the mental and moral contents be what they may.
The object in question was an ancient casket (one of his father's bargains); inside the casket reposed an old-fashioned carbuncle brooch, set in silver (another of his father's bargains) -- bridal presents both, possessing the inestimable merit of leaving his money undisturbed in his pocket.
This precious volume, of which I do not recollect one word, I immediately discovered and immediately applied myself to; and I never visited the house afterwards, but I kneeled on a chair, opened the casket where this gem was enshrined, spread my arms over the desk, and fell to devouring the book afresh.
After a prolonged absence at this stage of the entertainment, he at length came back with a casket of precious appearance containing twigs.
Formerly, his heart had been as a locked casket with its treasure inside; but now the casket was empty, and the lock was broken.
Let us see first what is in the other casket before we begin to be angry,' thought the Emperor, and there came out the nightingale.
She had been seen for the first time by a man with her laces cut, her treasures violently bursting from their casket.
Besides these, a casket of magnificent goldwork, with the same arms as the sword and the portrait, formed a middle ornament to the mantelpiece, and assorted badly with the rest of the furniture.
It is a casket of wood bound with iron," thought he.
She washed her, wrapped her in a shroud, put her into the casket, laid a wreath of flowers on her head and arranged her curls.