casuist


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ca·su·ist

 (kăzh′o͞o-ĭst)
n.
A person who is expert in or given to casuistry.

[French casuiste, from Spanish casuista, from Latin cāsus, case; see case1.]

casuist

(ˈkæzjʊɪst)
n
1. (Philosophy) a person, esp a theologian, who attempts to resolve moral dilemmas by the application of general rules and the careful distinction of special cases
2. a person who is oversubtle in his or her analysis of fine distinctions; sophist
[C17: from French casuiste, from Spanish casuista, from Latin cāsus case1]
ˌcasuˈistic, ˌcasuˈistical adj
ˌcasuˈistically adv

cas•u•ist

(ˈkæʒ u ɪst)

n.
1. an oversubtle or disingenuous reasoner.
2. a person who applies ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.
[1600–10; < Sp casuista < Latin cāsu(s) case1]

casuist

1. a person who studies and resolves questions of right and wrong in conduct.
2. an oversubtle or specious reasoner. — casuistic, adj.
See also: Ethics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.casuist - someone whose reasoning is subtle and often specious
ratiocinator, reasoner - someone who reasons logically
Translations

casuist

[ˈkæzjʊɪst] N (frm) → casuista mf (pej) → sofista mf

casuist

nKasuist m
References in classic literature ?
He was, then, as punctual as the Samaritan woman, and the most rigorous casuist with regard to duels could have nothing to say.
Upon my word, Julia, you are quite a casuist on this subject.
But with all the ardour of a neophyte and the pride of an apt learner I was at that time a great nautical casuist.
During the youth of his sons, Lord Steyne, who was a good scholar and amateur casuist, had no better sport in the evening after dinner in the country than in setting the boys' tutor, the Reverend Mr.
I was strangely surprised at this question; and, after all, though I was now an old man, yet I was but a young doctor, and ill qualified for a casuist or a solver of difficulties; and at first I could not tell what to say; so I pretended not to hear him, and asked him what he said; but he was too earnest for an answer to forget his question, so that he repeated it in the very same broken words as above.
Whether any one who has been subjected by the laws of his country to an unjust judgment is right in attempting to escape, is a thesis about which casuists might disagree.
We shall leave casuists to determine how far she resembled any other believers in this particular, and proceed directly with the matter before us.
The casuists have become a byword of reproach; but their perverted spirit of minute discrimination was the shadow of a truth to which eyes and hearts are too often fatally sealed,--the truth, that moral judgments must remain false and hollow, unless they are checked and enlightened by a perpetual reference to the special circumstances that mark the individual lot.
More than that, we become casuists, we learn to be Jesuitical and for a time maybe we can soothe ourselves, we can persuade ourselves that it is one's duty for a good object.
The obvious vehicle by which the hospital ethics committee could develop this taxonomy of cases and educate the institution generally into the casuist analysis of cases, would be regularly scheduled "ethical grand rounds.
No longer is the casuist one among other casuists who privately determine solutions and promulgate decisions.
One such text, the Medulla theologiae moralis by the casuist Herman Busenbaum, S.