casuistry


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ca·su·ist·ry

 (kăzh′o͞o-ĭ-strē)
n. pl. ca·sui·ist·ries
1. Specious or excessively subtle reasoning intended to rationalize or mislead.
2. The determination of right and wrong in questions of conduct or conscience by analyzing cases that illustrate general ethical rules.

[From casuist.]

casuistry

(ˈkæzjʊɪstrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
2. reasoning that is specious, misleading, or oversubtle

cas•u•ist•ry

(ˈkæʒ u ə stri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. oversubtle, fallacious, or dishonest reasoning; sophistry.
2. the application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct.
[1715–25]

casuistry

1. the branch of ethics or theology that studies the relation of general ethical principles to particular cases of conduct or conscience.
2. a dishonest or oversubtle application of such principles.
See also: Ethics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.casuistry - argumentation that is specious or excessively subtle and intended to be misleading
line of reasoning, logical argument, argumentation, argument, line - a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"
2.casuistry - moral philosophy based on the application of general ethical principles to resolve moral dilemmas
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
probabilism - a Roman Catholic system of casuistry that when expert opinions differ an actor can follow any solidly probable opinion that he wishes even though some different opinion might be more probable

casuistry

noun sophistry, chicanery, equivocation, speciousness, sophism Every system of moral rules, laws, and principles gives rise to casuistry.

casuistry

noun
Plausible but invalid reasoning:
Translations

casuistry

[ˈkæzjʊɪstrɪ] N (frm) → casuística f (pej) → sofismas mpl, razonamiento m falaz

casuistry

[ˈkæzjuɪstri] n (formal)casuistique f

casuistry

nKasuistik f
References in classic literature ?
or was it, I have sometimes wondered, an unconscious and after all a sound casuistry that had saved Elizabeth's soul, an instinctive philosophy that taught her, so to say, to lay a Sigurd's sword between her soul and body, and to argue that nothing can defile the body without the consent of the soul.
Her casuistry was interrupted by some one softly whistling a theme from the overture to Masaniello, popular at the college in the form of an arrangement for six pianofortes and twelve hands.
It may be observed however that Plato never intended to answer the question of casuistry, but only to exhibit the ideal of patient virtue which refuses to do the least evil in order to avoid the greatest, and to show his master maintaining in death the opinions which he had professed in his life.
Containing the great address of the landlady, the great learning of a surgeon, and the solid skill in casuistry of the worthy lieutenant.
And the paradoxes in which Raffles revelled, and the frivolous casuistry which was nevertheless half sincere, and which his mere personality rendered wholly plausible at the moment of utterance, appealed very little to me when recalled in cold blood.
Meanwhile it would seem, as regards the moral question, that his analysis was complete; his casuistry had become keen as a razor, and he could not find rational objections in himself.
The fates of both the zealots and of the natives are mostly sad, occasionally tragic, but when Kracht renders them in language ranging from theological casuistry to absolute slapstick comedy one hoots ones way through the book.
The principle of double effect has been under considerable criticism from philosophers, who prefer to reduce it to utilitarian calculus, and from Christian thinkers who worry that it smacks of hairsplitting casuistry.
The contracting authority reserves the right, in the period of the framework agreement to increase or decrease the amount being auctioned according to the needs of the contracting authority in relation to the financial resources and casuistry hospital.
It is not casuistry, but a political operation conducted against [President Recep Tayyip] Erdoy-an.
In the wake of the Tridentine reforms, the juridical nature of penance predominates in the emerging casuistry.
He looks at teaching rather than student learning and describes the field's uncertainty about pedagogy; the history and theory of the postpedagogical movement in composition, in which scholars argue not to put too much faith in pedagogy; the application of Dewey's ideas; and the teaching application of casuistry as a method of case-based reasoning for situations in which two values conflict.