cataclysm


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cat·a·clysm

 (kăt′ə-klĭz′əm)
n.
1. A violent upheaval that causes great destruction or brings about a fundamental change.
2. A violent and sudden change in the earth's crust.
3. A devastating flood.

[French cataclysme, from Latin cataclysmos, deluge, from Greek kataklusmos, from katakluzein, to inundate : kata-, intensive pref.; see cata- + kluzein, to wash away.]

cat′a·clys′mic (-klĭz′mĭk), cat′a·clys′mal (-klĭz′məl) adj.
cat′a·clys′mi·cal·ly adv.

cataclysm

(ˈkætəˌklɪzəm)
n
1. a violent upheaval, esp of a political, military, or social nature
2. (Physical Geography) a disastrous flood; deluge
3. (Geological Science) geology another name for catastrophe4
[C17: via French from Latin, from Greek kataklusmos deluge, from katakluzein to flood, from kluzein to wash]
ˌcataˈclysmic, ˌcataˈclysmal adj
ˌcataˈclysmically adv

cat•a•clysm

(ˈkæt əˌklɪz əm)

n.
1. any violent upheaval, esp. one of a social or political nature.
2. a sudden and violent physical action producing changes in the earth's surface.
3. an extensive flood; deluge.
[1625–35; < Late Latin cataclysmos (Vulgate) < Greek kataklysmós flood, n. derivative of kataklýzein to flood =kata- cata- + klýzein (of the sea) to wash over, surge]
cat`a•clys′mic, cat`a•clys′mal, adj.
cat`a•clys′mi•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See disaster.

cataclysm

any major disaster, as an earthquake, flood, etc. See also water. — cataclysmal, adj.
See also: Earthquakes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cataclysm - a sudden violent change in the earth's surface
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
nuclear winter - a long period of darkness and extreme cold that scientists predict would follow a full-scale nuclear war; a layer of dust and smoke in the atmosphere would cover the earth and block the rays of the sun; most living organisms would perish
2.cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortunecataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
act of God, force majeure, inevitable accident, unavoidable casualty, vis major - a natural and unavoidable catastrophe that interrupts the expected course of events; "he discovered that his house was not insured against acts of God"
apocalypse - a cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil
famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
kiss of death - something that is ruinous; "if this were known it would be the kiss of death for my political career"
meltdown - a disaster comparable to a nuclear meltdown; "there is little likelihood of a meltdown comparable to the American banking collapse in March 1933"
plague - any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
visitation - any disaster or catastrophe; "a visitation of the plague"
tidal wave - an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
tsunami - a cataclysm resulting from a destructive sea wave caused by an earthquake or volcanic eruption; "a colossal tsunami destroyed the Minoan civilization in minutes"

cataclysm

noun disaster, collapse, catastrophe, upheaval, debacle, devastation, calamity the cataclysm that was overwhelming Europe before the Second World War

cataclysm

noun
1. An occurrence inflicting widespread destruction and distress:
2. A momentous or sweeping change:
3. An abundant, usually overwhelming flow or fall, as of a river or rain:
Chiefly British: spate.
Translations
كارِثَه
katastrofapohromazkáza
katastrofeomvæltning
náttúruhamfarir
kataklizmaskatastrofiškas
kataklizma, stihiska nelaime
kataklizma
âfetfelâket

cataclysm

[ˈkætəklɪzəm] Ncataclismo m

cataclysm

[ˈkætəklɪzəm] ncataclysme m

cataclysm

nVerheerung f; (fig)Umwälzung f

cataclysm

[ˈkætəˌklɪzm] ncataclisma m

cataclysm

(ˈkӕtəklizəm) noun
a violent disaster or upheaval; disaster.
ˌcataˈclysmic adjective
References in classic literature ?
The hour of the intended cataclysm was approaching apace.
With some men it needs a cataclysm, as a stone may be broken to fragments by the fury of a torrent; but with some it comes gradually, as a stone may be worn away by the ceaseless fall of a drop of water.
If a flood comes, the mountains will have long disappeared beneath the waves, while the birds will still be flying about; and if a single ark floats on the surface of the cataclysm, they will alight upon it, will float with it, will be present with it at the ebbing of the waters; and the new world which emerges from this chaos will behold, on its awakening, the thought of the world which has been submerged soaring above it, winged and living.
And they had been but the first warning impacts of universal cataclysm.
No cataclysm of nature had caused this, but, rather, the tyranny of the labour unions.
These children had, doubtless, been too young to retain in their memories to transmit to their children any but the vaguest suggestion of the cataclysm which had overwhelmed their parents.
It appeared from Fyne's narrative that the day before the first rumble of the cataclysm the questionable young man arrived unexpectedly in Brighton to stay with his "Aunt.
He bounded silently into the air, his whole being rent asunder as by a cataclysm.
She goes about her business indifferent to wars, revolutions, and cataclysms.
Another set pretended that out of one thousand new moons that had been observed, nine hundred and fifty had been attended with remarkable disturbances, such as cataclysms, revolutions, earthquakes, the deluge, etc.
Nevertheless so profound is our ignorance, and so high our presumption, that we marvel when we hear of the extinction of an organic being; and as we do not see the cause, we invoke cataclysms to desolate the world, or invent laws on the duration of the forms of life!
Had he been informed by an indisputable authority that the end of the world was to be finally accomplished by a catastrophic disturbance of the atmosphere, he would have assimilated the information under the simple idea of dirty weather, and no other, because he had no experience of cataclysms, and belief does not necessarily imply comprehension.