catalexis


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Related to catalexis: Acatalexis

cat·a·lex·is

 (kăt′l-ĕk′sĭs)
n. pl. cat·a·lex·es (-sēz′)
The absence of one or more syllables in a line of verse, especially in the last foot.

[Greek katalēxis, from katalēgein, to leave off; see catalectic.]

catalexis

(ˌkætəˈlɛksɪs)
n
the state of lacking a syllable in the last foot of a line of poetry

catalexis

incompleteness of a foot, wherever it appears in a verse. — catalectic, adj.
See also: Verse
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catalexis - the absence of a syllable in the last foot of a line or verse
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
References in periodicals archive ?
Suzuki presents his research into verse types and their realizations, anacrusus and catalexis, resolutions, the cadence, alliteration, and the stanza.
Catalexis literally means "coming to an abrupt end," and according to Roger A.
And then there was James Russell Lowell, a contemporary of Whitman, whose Fable for Critics (1848) at first bothered its readers, until they understood Lowell's internal joke: though he made the introduction appear to be prose on the page, it was actually poetry and quite stylized poetry at that--rhymed couplets in anapestic tetrameter, characterized by both catalexis and feminine endings:
The final line, accordingly, seems to become a series of amphibrachs, the final one, a catalexis that shifts the initial absence to the end: "Hath mel ted | like snow in | the glance of | the Lord.
Saul," which also employs catalexis, provides for an analysis of the falling cadence.
Comparative Table of Catalexes and Harsh Mappings (1000-line samples) Lines with Initial Internal Total Harsh Catalexes Catalexis Catalexis Mappings Pope 0 0 0 0 Milton (PL) 0 0 0 0.
Before the twentieth century, catalexis was avoided in the literary or "for-print" tradition as a solecism, even by Shakespeare: after all, the one thing every schoolboy knows about iambic pentameter is that it has at least ten syllables, two per foot, and even theoreticians of meter only came to recognize the possibility of the so-called "monosyllabic foot" in the second half of the nineteenth century (see, for example, Abbott 372-85).
Misleading also is his explanation of the important technical term catalexis as a "fade-out, or tail-away" (p.
Note that the last line has only seven metrical positions (H or LL) rather than the expected eight; the traditional term for this is catalexis.
This line exhibits catalexis, the common variation of omitting an unstressed syllable at the end of a line.
On the other hand a robust majority of readers, their habits formed perhaps on the Africanizing backbeat of blues and rock, look to the end and read the line iambically with the acephalous catalexis of a premised initial slack.
Timothy Steele, in his exploration of catalexis, discusses the tetrameters of Barrett Browning's "The Best Thing in the World" (1862) in All the Fun's in How You Say a Thing: An Explanation of Meter and Versification (Athens: Ohio Univ.