catastasis


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

ca·tas·ta·sis

 (kə-tăs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. ca·tas·ta·ses (-sēz′)
1. The intensified part of the action directly preceding the catastrophe in classical tragedy.
2. The climax of a drama.

[Greek katastasis, settled state, from kathistanai, to come into a certain state : kat-, kata-, cata- + histanai, to set; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

catastasis

(kəˈtæstəsɪs)
n
the part of a drama immediately preceding the climax or action-filled scene

catastasis

the climax of a play or other dramatic representation; that part preceding the catastrophe, where the action is at its height.
See also: Drama
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, in a more Brechtian key, we are left stranded in catastasis, and Bernard Shaw and Totalitarianism forgoes anodyne closure in favor of sustained dissonance.
Joshua the Stylite, Philagathos' De siccitate, and Synesius of Cyrene's Catastasis.
Non enim excursus hic ejus, sed opus ipsum est," (1) he quotes in the seventh volume, gently chiding any reader who might still, at that late date, be hoping for the traditional sequence of protasis, epitasis, catastasis, catastrophe, and peripeteia.