catch fire


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Related to catch fire: Halt and Catch Fire

catch

 (kăch, kĕch)
v. caught (kôt), catch·ing, catch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To get and hold (something that has been in motion) in a hand, the hands, a container, or an implement: caught the ball in the web of the lacrosse stick.
b. To take hold of, especially forcibly or suddenly; grasp: caught me by the arm; caught the reins.
c. To stop (oneself) from doing an action: I caught myself before replying.
2.
a. To capture or seize, especially after a chase: The police caught the robber in the next town.
b. To capture or take by trapping, snaring, or some other means: I caught three fish with that lure.
c. To take in and hold or contain: a pond that catches runoff.
3.
a. To discover or come upon suddenly, unexpectedly, or accidentally: He was caught in the act of stealing.
b. To become cognizant or aware of suddenly: caught her gazing out the window.
4.
a. To reach just in time; get so as to be carried by: caught the bus to town; catch a wave.
b. To overtake: The driver of the green car caught the leader on the straightaway.
5.
a. To cause to become hooked, entangled, or fastened: caught my hem on the stair.
b. To hold up; delay: was caught in traffic for an hour.
6.
a. To make contact with; strike: The boxer caught his opponent with a left hook.
b. To propel an object so that it hits (something): The center caught the back of the net with a hard shot.
7.
a. To become subject to or to contract, as by exposure to a pathogen: catch a cold.
b. To become affected by or infused with: caught the joyous mood of the festival.
c. To suffer from the receipt of (criticism, for example): caught hell for being late.
8.
a. To perceive suddenly or momentarily: We caught a glimpse of the movie star. I caught a whiff of her perfume.
b. To hear or listen to: caught the news bulletin on the radio; didn't catch the end of your sentence
c. To grasp mentally; apprehend: I don't catch your meaning.
9.
a. To go to see (a performance, for example): caught the midnight show.
b. To get (something required), usually quickly or for a brief period: catch some sleep.
10.
a. To attract and fix; arrest: couldn't catch their attention; caught the teacher's eye.
b. To reproduce or represent effectively: an impressionist who caught the effects of wind and water in his paintings.
11. To deceive: failed to be caught by their fraudulent schemes.
12. Baseball To play (a game) as catcher.
v.intr.
1. To become held, entangled, or fastened: My coat caught in the car door.
2. To act or move so as to hold or grab someone or something: tried to catch at the life preserver.
3. To be communicable or infectious; spread.
4. To become ignited: The fire caught.
5. Baseball To act as catcher.
n.
1.
a. The act of catching, especially the grabbing and holding of a thrown, kicked, or batted ball before it hits the ground.
b. A game of throwing and catching a ball.
2.
a. A quantity that is caught: The catch amounted to 50 fish.
b. Something that is perceived or noticed: The mistake you found was a good catch.
c. Informal A person considered to be an attractive or admirable romantic partner.
3. A tricky or previously unsuspected condition or drawback: It sounds like a good offer, but there may be a catch.
4. A device for fastening something or for checking motion: The car's hood has a safety catch.
5. A choking or stoppage of the breath or voice: a catch in his voice.
6. A snatch; a fragment: could only hear catches of the song.
7. Music A canonic, often rhythmically intricate composition for three or more voices, popular especially in the 17th and 18th centuries.
Phrasal Verbs:
catch on
1. To understand something: These students catch on quickly.
2. To become popular: Skateboarding caught on quickly.
catch out
To detect (another) in wrongdoing or error.
catch up
1. To move fast enough to attain the same progress as another; draw even: caught up to the leader on the last lap of the race.
2. To become equal or on a par with another: finally caught up with his brother in height.
3. To bring an activity to completion or to a state of currentness: catch up on correspondence.
4. To bring (another) up to date; brief: Let me catch you up on all the gossip.
5. To seize or lift suddenly: The wind caught up the umbrella and carried it off.
6. To involve, often unwillingly: was caught up in the scandal.
7. To captivate; enthrall: I was caught up in the mood of the evening.
Idioms:
catch fire
1. To ignite.
2. To become very enthusiastic.
3. To become the subject of great interest and widespread enthusiasm: an idea that caught fire all over the country.
catch it Informal
To receive a punishment or scolding.
catch (one's) breath
To rest so as to be able to continue an activity.
catch (one's) death
To catch a cold or other illness.
catch up with
1. To find or arrest after a period of pursuit: The police finally caught up with him in Omaha.
2. To have unpleasant consequences for, especially after a period of quiescence: mistakes that caught up with him when he ran for president.
catch you later
Informal Used to express good-bye.

[Middle English cacchen, from Old North French cachier, to chase, from Vulgar Latin *captiāre; see chase1.]

catch′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: catch, enmesh, ensnare, entangle, entrap, snare1, trap1
These verbs mean to take in and hold as if by using bait or a lure: caught in a web of lies; enmeshed in the dispute; ensnared an unsuspecting customer; became entangled in her own contradictions; entrapped by a convincing undercover agent; snared by false hopes; trapped into incriminating himself.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.catch fire - start to burn or burst into flames; "Marsh gases ignited suddenly"; "The oily rags combusted spontaneously"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
blow out - erupt in an uncontrolled manner; "The oil well blew out"
catch - start burning; "The fire caught"
light up - start to burn with a bright flame; "The coal in the BBQ grill finally lit up"
combust, burn - cause to burn or combust; "The sun burned off the fog"; "We combust coal and other fossil fuels"
Translations
يَبْدأ بالأحْتِراق، يَمْسِكُ النار
chytitvzplanout
antænde
meggyullad
fara aî loga, kvikna í
引火する
ateş almaktutuşmak

fire

(ˈfaiə) noun
1. anything that is burning, whether accidentally or not. a warm fire in the kitchen; Several houses were destroyed in a fire.
2. an apparatus for heating. a gas fire; an electric fire.
3. the heat and light produced by burning. Fire is one of man's greatest benefits.
4. enthusiasm. with fire in his heart.
5. attack by gunfire. The soldiers were under fire.
verb
1. (of china, pottery etc) to heat in an oven, or kiln, in order to harden and strengthen. The ceramic pots must be fired.
2. to make (someone) enthusiastic; to inspire. The story fired his imagination.
3. to operate (a gun etc) by discharging a bullet etc from it. He fired his revolver three times.
4. to send out or discharge (a bullet etc) from a gun etc. He fired three bullets at the target.
5. (often with at or on) to aim and operate a gun at; to shoot at. They suddenly fired on us; She fired at the target.
6. to send away someone from his/her job; to dismiss. He was fired from his last job for being late.
fire alarm
an apparatus (eg a bell) to give warning of a fire. Everyone had to leave the building when the fire alarm rang.
ˈfirearm noun
any type of gun. In most countries you need a licence to keep firearms.
ˈfire-brigade noun
a company of firemen. Call the fire-brigade!
ˈfire-cracker noun
a kind of firework which makes a loud noise.
ˈfire-engine noun
a vehicle carrying firemen and their equipment.
ˈfire-escape noun
a means of escape from a building in case of fire, usually in the form of a metal staircase on the outside of the building. Hotels should have fire-escapes.
ˈfire-extinguisher noun
an apparatus (usually containing chemicals) for putting out fires. There must be fire-extinguishers in every room.
ˈfire-guard noun
a metal framework placed in front of a fireplace for safety.
ˈfireman noun
a man whose job is to put out accidental fires or those caused deliberately as a criminal act.
ˈfireplace noun
a space in a room (usually in a wall) with a chimney above, for a fire. a wide stone fireplace.
ˈfireproof adjective
that is made so it cannot catch fire. a fireproof suit.
ˈfireside noun
a place beside a fireplace. The old man slept by the fireside; (also adjective) a fireside chair.
ˈfire-station noun
the building or buildings where fire-engines and other pieces of equipment used by firemen are kept.
ˈfirewood noun
wood that is suitable for burning as fuel. I went into the garden to cut firewood.
ˈfirework noun
a small exploding device giving off a colourful display of lights. Rockets are my favourite fireworks; (also adjective) a firework display; If your sister finds out, there'll be fireworks (= a display of anger)!
ˈfiring-squad noun
a group of soldiers with guns, to execute a prisoner. He must face the firing-squad.
catch fire
to begin to burn. Dry wood catches fire easily.
on fire
burning. The building is on fire!
open fire (usually with on)
to begin shooting at. The enemy opened fire (on us).
play with fire
to do something dangerous or risky. Putting all your money into that business is playing with fire!
set fire to (something) / set (something) on fire
to cause (something) to begin burning usually accidentally or deliberately as a criminal act. They set fire to the ambassador's house; She has set the house on fire.
under fire
1. being shot at. We have been under fire from the enemy all day.
2. being criticized or blamed. The government is under fire.
References in classic literature ?
He saw the man's eyes catch fire, the muscles of his face twitch, he saw Ernestine shrink back, white with terror and the man followed her.
With us two it is for life and death, and I am rather pleased that there is something yet in him that can catch fire on occasion.
When he reached the Abbey, he turned back and crossed Westminster Bridge and sat down to watch the trails of smoke behind the Houses of Parliament catch fire with the sunset.
At length they rose from the water in their proper forms, but darting such flames of fire from their mouths that we dreaded lest the palace should catch fire.