catchcry

catchcry

(ˈkætʃˌkraɪ)
n, pl -cries
(Linguistics) Austral a well-known, frequently used phrase, esp one associated with a particular group, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
They held signs reading "I am Kenji", mourning the intrepid journalist by echoing the catchcry of mourners of victims of the shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo in early January.
The campaign to unionise Walmart, directed by Schlademan, demonstrated to conference participants the high value of unions moving to online organising--Online to Off tine is the new catchcry.
Flight to safety has become a common catchcry in 2011 and, given the ongoing macroeconomic uncertainty, risk aversion may well continue to be a key theme in 2012," says agricultural lender Rabobank.
In 1947 in Africa, the catchcry was "After the cattle the sheep; after the sheep the goats; after the goats the desert.
Literacy became the catchcry of the Howard Government and a number of Commonwealth reports, media statements and funding programs are characteristic of this period.
The Reader Organisation's catchcry of 'It's as if a hand has reached out and taken yours,' is an adaptation of the words ' .
91) The New Labour catchcry of 'fairness not favours', according to Leopold, 'implies an end to the particular special relationship, with unions becoming one of many pressure groups seeking to influence the government'.
The catchcry of the genetic counselling profession has for many years been the need for it to be 'non-directive'.
This provides the catalyst for the animals to work together and also opens up new joyous experiences with the catchcry that 'Friends do turn up in unlikely places', as an affirming and satisfying resolution to a pleasant narrative.
The song has become your catchcry, or your expression, for a minute, a day, or for longer.