categorially

categorially

(ˌkætɪˈɡɔːrɪəlɪ)
adv
in a manner relating to or involving categories
References in periodicals archive ?
We can equip ourselves with new conceptual capacities, in that sense, by isolating and focusing on--annexing bits of language to--other aspects of the categorially unified content of the experience, aspects that were hitherto not within the scope of our capacities for explicit thought.
7) For Bjorck, however, this low degree of conceptual integration lies primarily with the fact that the adjectival participle is categorially an adjective ('adjektiviert,' adjectivised): (8) in his opinion an expression such as ouucpepovTec, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Dem.
Also, it is denied that obligation is diminished by value-insight or that all norms are categorially moral.
If scrambling is optional XP-movement, the movement of the categorially distinct weak pronouns cannot be scrambling and must be governed by other regularities.
A form-c is, categorially speaking, a shareable feature of a composite, while a form-m is a particular feature of some matter of a composite.
The role of ontological categories in our systematization of the world is analogous to the role of axioms in systems of logic: as there is more than one way of axiomatising a logic, so there is more than one way of categorially classifying the world (134-5, cf.
In the cases of approximation at the base level, on the contrary, model and copy as such are categorially identical, differing only in the semantic category of the base (and, possibly, the semantic relation between base and affix or the two bases, in the case of compounds).
Establishment of Medicare created a reasonable set of social expectations that a certain level of health care would be assured to elderly and other categorially defined Americans.
Lexical readings are not categorially restricted, and vicarious specification is very generally available, as illustrated by (42b).
2) See Michael Oakeshott, On Human Conduct (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975), 15: "Thus the movement of a human eyelid is a categorially ambiguous identity; it may be a wink or a blink, a wink which is an exhibition of intelligence, a subscription to a 'practice' and has a reason, and a blink which is a component of a 'process' to be understood in terms of a 'law' or a 'cause'.
7) is an example of a copular sentence where the past participle is categorially an adjective.
Although easily recognizable phonetically and categorially the Old English prowend hardly ever is likely to be associated with an animal.